Pruning--climbing roses, grape vines, clymatis

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by sadovnik, Jan 19, 2008.

  1. sadovnik

    sadovnik Member

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    Hello,

    I am new to the forum and have lots of questions I hope some more seasoned gardeners can help me on. For now, I wonder if anyone could tell me the best time to prune climbing roses, grape vines, and clymatis? Also, what is the best method for doing this? Should each one be cut down completely, with just a bit of growth remaining? I seem to recall that the climbing rose only gets pruned back a bit, but I could use help on this. I want to make sure they all come back in the spring!

    thanks
     
  2. Ralph Walton

    Ralph Walton Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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  3. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member

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  4. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    How old are your climbing roses?

    Here is the routine I follow.

    1. Throughout the flowering season, I
    a. dead head the repeat climbers. "Once-flowering" climbers are allowed to set hips. Thehips add much needed colour at this time of the year.
    b. Start training some of the new canes, before they get too stiff and unmanageble.

    2. In late fall, I
    a. remove all the dead, diseased and non-productive old canes, and those that cross and rub against each other.
    b. dead head all remaining flowers and shorten the laterals if necessary
    c. prune off all canes and laterals which have grown "out of bounds". Except for the "once flowering" climbers, and climbing Peace - these, I leave alone till after the spring flush of blooms.
    d. secure and tie down all the remaining canes, to reduce damage from wind and snow.

    3. In the spring, usually late March, early April, I
    a. inspect for winter damage and die back, pruning canes and laterals to healthy viable tissue.
    b. more tying and securing if needed.
    c. final "shape up" pruning - redirecting canes to where I want them to be, removing more of those that have ventured too far.
     

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