General: Propagation Possible or Mission Impossible?

Discussion in 'Herbs for the Kitchen' started by SvenLittkowski, Jan 28, 2010.

  1. SvenLittkowski

    SvenLittkowski Active Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kingston, Jamaica
    Please have a look at the attached photo.

    I bought these seeds and the herb, well, mostly for culinary purposes. These are from left to right in that photo:
    - Caraway Seeds
    - Anise Seeds
    - Coriander Seeds
    - Cilantro Herb

    But last night I slept uncalm and finally fell out of my bed and knocked my head mightily on the floor, and got at that moment the following idea: could it be possible to grow those plants through these seeds the way they are sold, and would it be possible (but instruction required) to grow the Cilantro as well? The Cilantro was taken from the cooling (not freezing) department of a supermarket, and it has no roots. On the other hand, I think, the coriander seeds and the Cilantro leafs with their stems are pretty much from the same plant, right?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member

    Messages:
    706
    Likes Received:
    33
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL USA USDA Zone 9
    Yes, Sven, you can often use culinary seed to grow the same plants.

    Different suppliers will handle them different ways, though. It's entirely possible that some seeds have been heat or even radiation treated to prevent sprouting. And some plants/seeds have been cured in ways that would incidentally stop sprouting.

    I've grown sesame, flax, caraway, dill, basil, poppy, and probably some others from culinary seeds. The basil was from dried leaf bits that had a few seeds at the bottom of the jar. The sesame was unhulled, untoasted of course.

    As far as the cilantro, yeah, the coriander seed will give you that plant, but you may be able to root the cuttings, too. I've rooted other herbs purchased for cooking plenty of times. Rosemary and lemongrass most often. I would imagine basil would be easy to root from cuttings, but parsley won't unless you have a bit of the root area.
     
  3. SvenLittkowski

    SvenLittkowski Active Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kingston, Jamaica
    Thanks! The way those seeds I got are, are they roasted or natural, can you see that?

    And the cilantro cuttings, what's actually the best way to make them rooting again? Can you describe it?
     
  4. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member

    Messages:
    706
    Likes Received:
    33
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL USA USDA Zone 9
    I couldn't tell from the photo, but I don't think anise, coriander, and caraway are roasted or cured in any way other than drying before packaging as seasoning.

    Caraway is a northern European spice in origin, so Jamaica may not be the best place to raise it. I don't recall if mine died off in the summer or not. I think it bolted, or went to seed quickly like parsley will for you and me.

    Look at the largest stems of cilantro. You'll want a couple of leaf nodes at the very least. If the bottom of the stem has split and curled, trim that off. I would think that it will only root at the leaf nodes, so cut your stem short below the node. Stick in potting soil covering at least one leaf node. If they are more than a few fingers apart, then only one leaf node. Cut most of the leaves off, and all of the one at the node that's being buried. I'd tent it with plastic until you see new growth.

    If you have rooting hormone or willows growing nearby, you might want to treat the cutting first.
     
  5. SvenLittkowski

    SvenLittkowski Active Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kingston, Jamaica
    thanks. Hmm... I will try. Let's see.
     

Share This Page