Propagating monkey puzzles from seeds

Discussion in 'Araucariaceae' started by sointula, Jan 24, 2015.

  1. sointula

    sointula Active Member

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    Another question on this topic - I have access to Monkey Puzzle Tree cones/pods - anyone have any suggestions on how to grow them from seeds?
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Re: Propagating Monkey Puzzle from cuttings? and a few other questions...

    Most important point: sow the seeds immediately after harvest, or store over winter chilled (+1 to +2°) and moist. The seeds are highly sensitive to drying out, and will be dead in a few days if kept in a warm dry place.
     
  3. sointula

    sointula Active Member

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    Re: Propagating Monkey Puzzle from cuttings? and a few other questions...

    Thanks Michael,

    Just to make sure I understand - pull the pod off the tree, get the seeds and plant in moist soil and keep moist?
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Re: Propagating Monkey Puzzle from cuttings? and a few other questions...

    Sure you've got the right tree?? They have cones, not pods ;-) Can you post a photo of what you refer to as 'pods'?

    That apart, yes. The cones ripen in late summer (August - September) and break up then to release the seeds.

    Pic 1 - mature cone (summer)
    Pic 2 - shed seeds (early September)
    Pic 3 - pollen cones (no seeds in these!)
     

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  5. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Anything attached to the tree at this time is presumably not in season. When the seeds and cone scales are on the ground beneath a specimen that produces seed cones (not all do*) then you know it is the right time. The easiest thing would be to pick the seeds up from off the ground. This will have to be done in a timely manner, before they are eaten by animals, gathered by someone else (people eat them also) or dry out (apparently).

    Supposedly sometimes seed cones come down partly entire and could conk anyone standing beneath, so if you are ever beneath a tree that is still shedding be mindful of this.

    *Pollen cones need to be present nearby or the seeds produced will be empty; most examples produce either all seed cones or all pollen cones
     

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