Propagating Gunnera Manicata

Discussion in 'Annuals, Biennials, Perennials, Ferns and Bulbs' started by Carol Ja, Aug 23, 2005.

  1. Carol Ja

    Carol Ja Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    I want to propagate my Gunnera Manicata, I'd like to know any tricks, (Humidity, or not, does it need to winter...) The big question I have is are the little brown things in the picture the seeds? They seem so small concidering the size of my plant ( I realise size isn't everythng).
    I want the kids in my class to grow this plant, it would be fun.
    Thanks Carol Ja
     

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  2. Carol Ja

    Carol Ja Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    So, I'm still wondering/ hoping if anyone has any tips for propagating Gunneras, when are the seeds concidered 'ripe' for taking, do they need to go through the winter? anything ??
    Carol Ja
     
  3. Carol Ja

    Carol Ja Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Okay, well I'm not getting a whole lot of response here? So I'll tell you what I am doing so far. I took some seeds from the plant, I don't know if they were ready or not, as it wasn't obvious. I've sprinkled the seeds on some wet soil. I'm treating them like I do most perennial seeds. I'm not putting them into light, they are hanging out in a shady shelf in the hallway where it is fairly warm.
    Feel free to tell me this is the wrong thing to do. I'm still hoping for some input.
    Carol Ja
     
  4. Vernon Greenthumb

    Vernon Greenthumb Member

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  5. NiftyNiall

    NiftyNiall Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    +++ Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction +++

    By dividing the rootball (most common method) and by dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

    Tiny red-brown flowers are borne in erect panicles to 1m in height. followed by small red berry-like fruits. sow in gentle heat as soon as ripe, seed quickly loses viability
    Germination improved by maintaining very moist,(not wet) conditions and temperatures of 75-85 degrees Celcius, germination should happen in two weeks.
    Germination may be slow and erratic, so prick out individual seedlings as they become large enough to handle and transfer to pots or trays. Over-winter in a cool, frost-free shed or greenhouse and plant out in April or May.
    Gunnera has roots that play host to microscopic blue-green algae, which convert atmospheric nitrogen into a soluble form of nitrogen that the plant can use for growth.
    water is the main way that the seeds colonize other areas. Birds are secondary.
    Probably a good one for children to grow, since it tolerates lots of water.
    Please do not plant in riparian areas!!!!
     
  6. Carol Ja

    Carol Ja Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Thanks, I actually have the seeds started, and have a couple that are sprouting.
    I've never heard of the plant causing skin irritation or allergic reaction. Although I can't say that I handle it much with the way the spikes are!
    Carol Ja
     
  7. SarahBalmer

    SarahBalmer Member

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    Hiya,

    I know you posted this enquiry 2 years ago, but I have only just joined so I was wondering how you got on?

    At my secondary school (11-18 year olds) we have a potted gunnera that was given to us by a very kindly neighbour, and it currently stands about 1m tall.

    Have your seeds grown into anything wonderful? Do you have any advice as to how to look after the young adult plants?

    I want to divide my plant to share it with another school (primary, age 4 - 11), and have had conflicting advice as to how to do this. One mentioned a saw and axe, another back-to-back forks. It all seems rather barbaric to treat this lovely plant so roughly, but I am a novice in this area.

    I live in southern England, and we are in mid winter, with our temperatures going down to about -1C at night.

    We don't have a pond (nor will my boss the Headmaster allow one), so we will be digging out some soil and creating a lined bog garden in a damp and shady corner, adding iris and ferns. Will the gunera live OK in this do you think????

    Any help would be very greatfully received.

    Thanks very much,

    Sarah Balmer
    St. George's School Gardening Club Leader
    England
     
  8. Dunc

    Dunc Active Member

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    I just fell my gunnera today and put it to bed , covered, for the winter.
    Someone was looking for seeds a while ago, so send me an e-mail and I will drop them in an envelope.
    As a side point my purple poppy, annual, that I have been planting for about 8 years, has thrown some really great multi ruffled heads, almost like a carnation They are in a limited supply but, will offer half my stock up for grabs. As well I have Pacific Giant Delpheniums and crocomious, Wrong spelling right, the humming bidrs love them.

    Drop me a line

    Dunc
     
  9. GreenElephant

    GreenElephant Active Member

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    Carol,

    I chop up the seed stalk and lay the mess on the surface of a flat or pot of compost. In the PNW our winters are mild and we have a few frosts. In a month or so all the pulpy stuff rots away and the seeds fall onto the soil surface. By December I cover the flat with a few inches of leaves to protect from hard frosts. Come spring I uncover. I have excellent germination. I have also fall sown fresh seed and had good germination. But the tee-tiny seedlings don't seem to grow much all winter. I feel that the winter sown seedlings catch up very fast in the spring. By the end of the first summer your seedlings will have leaves about the size of a quarter and a tiny fleshy crown. But by their third summer you will have 3 foot wide leaves and a fist sized crown, well on your way to a big gunnera. Have fun. Jim
     
  10. Chris47

    Chris47 Member

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    In spring, chop chunks off with a shoot, pot up, keep moist, very very easy.
     

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