Propagation: Problem Germinating Osmanthus fragrant seeds

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by bmbalbert, Feb 20, 2009.

  1. bmbalbert

    bmbalbert Member

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    Hi,
    Few months ago I received my osmanthus seeds ordered from India and started with GA3 solutions for 3 days and sow the seeds. It has been 2 months now and not one seed germinated. Can someone help me and adv methods of germinating these seeds.
    Thanks

    BMB Albert
     
  2. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    We don't grow Osmanthus fragrans at UBCBG, but the species that we did germinate (Osmanthus suavis) took 18 months to germinate. There were two lots. The one with seed coat removed germinated (poorly) and the one with seed coat intact did not have any germination.

    Info on the web generally recommends sowing fresh seed with warm and cool stratification and says it takes 6 to 18 months for germination.
    http://www.ibiblio.org/pfaf/cgi-bin/arr_html?Osmanthus+fragrans

    There are a lot of reports about germinating Osamanthus fragrans online, but most are in Chinese and I can't read them.
     
  3. bmbalbert

    bmbalbert Member

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    Thanks Eric for your reply and adv. Wah! I have to wait a very long time to germinate these seeds. Anyway, I will try it.
    Thanks once again.
     
  4. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Good luck in germinating the seeds. Osmanthus fragrans, (Sweet Olive), is an old favorite for growing in pots in greenhouses. The wonderfully fragrant white flowers are excellent for scenting tea. In July, if you can obtain half-ripe cuttings, 3-4 inches long they can be rooted in sand. Cuttings can also be rooted in fall in a greenhouse. - Millet (1,427-)
     
  5. bmbalbert

    bmbalbert Member

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    Thanks Millet for your imput. Lately, I manage to buy a pot of osmanthus and plant is about 2 feet tall and the white flowers is very very fragrant . I will try your methods to propagate by half-ripe cuttings about 4 inches long and try rooting in sand. Wah! it will be very much faster compare to germinating from seeds. Your suggestion is really great.
     
  6. Fullmilk

    Fullmilk Member

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    I also wanted to start from seeds, but this method seems to be much faster.

    When you say sand, what do you mean with that? (Excuse this stupid question, but I'm not really a master gardener - all I want to do is grow Osmanthus from my in laws for my wives birthday)
    Do I get soil mixed with sand, or is it just bare sand like found at the beach?

    Really hope guys can help me!
     
  7. Peperomia

    Peperomia Active Member

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    You can also try fullmilk to root them in a soil less rooting mix. Good luck! My Osmanthus heterophyllus variegatus is different. Commonly known as False holly. Anyway I'll try growing Osmanthus fragrans from my friends cutting.
     
  8. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    NO. Not Beach sand. It's too salty.

    Use Builders sand that you get at Home Depot or the like.

    Actually most soil-less mixes will work well and they're already Pasturized.

    Ray
     
  9. SC Plant Nut

    SC Plant Nut Member

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    Osmanthus have what is referred to as double dormancy. In other words, they need two cold periods (winters) to germinate the following spring. Removing the flesh from the seed will also enhance germination. This cold period must be separated by at least 3-4 months of warm. But yes, cuttings are a far quicker means of propagatiing a new plant. Since I have a nursery, we take Osmanthus fragrans cuttings in the spring. Let the new growth flush out and let the new branches get just firm enough so that if one bent it sharply, it would snap. This is usually before the stem turns from green to gray/brown. We take cuttings with two sets of leaves, (if leaves are large, just one set will do) and each of these leaves we cut in half to reduce the leaf surface. We slightly wound the base of the cutting, scrapping it with a pair of hand shears or a knife or even ones finger nail will do, for about half an inch from the base of the cutting. We treat with a 7:1 dilution of Dip and Grow, a commercial propagation harmone that is available at most good garden centers. Dip base of cutting in the solution for about 10 seconds. A powered form of Rootone will work also, but make sure it is either No. 2 or No. 3. No. 1 is too weak. First dip the base of the cutting in water and then dip it into the powder, knocking off any excess. We of course use a mist system, but a home gardener can easily make what I call a 100% humidity chamber with a clear plastic bag over your cuttings and secured around the base with a rubber band. Place it in very bright light but no direct sunlight as one will "bake" their cuttings because of heat build up. Since one will not be constantly "wetting" ones rooting medium, I have found that vermiculite (not perlite) works quite well. Always make sure that water is condensing on your little greenhouse or check periodically to see if you need to re-moisten your rooting medium.
     

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