Possible to ID this rose?

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by jorielle, Mar 27, 2008.

  1. jorielle

    jorielle Member

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    I apologize for the bad picture.

    I am a newbie. We have this rose in the garden for 2 years, and in the summer it grows very long branches all over the places and I used to cut them off. Because we didn't know anything about roses, it was badly pruned. :(

    I've looked at some books on roses but there are so many kinds that I still cannot tell what kind this one is. I think it is probably some kind of climbing rose because of the long branches. If so, then I will need to build something for it to climb. Right? I just want to know exactly what kind of rose it is so I can look it up in the book and take proper care of it.

    Sorry I don't have a better picture right now. This picture was taken last month but now there is no flower, only leaves, and branches.

    Thanks.
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years of Activity

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    Possibly yet another case where the original scion has died, to be replaced by the 'Dr Huey' upon which it was grafted. This is very common up here where I live, either there are many failed grafted roses around dating back to hard winters that killed the scions or something else is causing those grafted onto 'Dr Huey' to die and leave the rootstock behind, like grave markers. Where you are freezing of the scion doesn't seem too likely, if I looked around there and saw the same numbers of failed unions with 'Dr Huey' that would further support the impression that there is another issue at work, perhaps graft incompatibility.

    If you see all the live canes coming from below an original, dead top that is higher up then that is likely what you have and the whole thing should be dug and discarded. Apart from it being prone to black spot here many 'Dr Huey' appear to be infested with rose mosaic virus - and there are so many of them around that there seems little point in growing it anyway. It CAN make a profuse display at peak bloom time, but otherwise it is not particularly interesting.
     
  3. jorielle

    jorielle Member

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    Wow, you are right. I had no idea what rose we had but I looked up Dr. Huey on the internet and this forum, and our rose fits every description. And I looked up "rose mosaic virus" and it seems that some of our leaves have that already. I guess we will dig it out, maybe after the bloom. Thank you for your expert knowledge!
     

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