plant list for Xeriscaping (z9)

Discussion in 'Gardening for Water Conservation' started by alex66, Jul 21, 2007.

  1. alex66

    alex66 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    ROME Italy zone9/b
    my plant dry resistent: (2/3 year after planted)
    Nerium oleander
    acer Campestre
    Olea Europaea
    Palms
    Callistemon
    Agave
    Arbutus unedo
    Berberis
    Buddleja
    Buxus
    Cedrus Libani
    Chorisia speciosa
    Clematis
    Cotinus
    Cotoneaster
    Cycas
    Ficus
    Pinus
    Grevillea
    Jasminum
    Laurus
    Lavanda
    Miscanthus
    Quercus Ilex
    Rose
    Rosmarinus
    Sedum
    Tamarix
    Tilia
    Yucca
    the garden idea of Ron B. is interesting plant dry resistent around and in centre plant whit more water requirements....
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Add:
    Callitris (if minimum temperatures do not go below -5°C)
    Cupressus
    Juniperus
    Tetraclinis (if minimum temperatures do not go below -5°C)
     
  3. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Lantzville, Vancouver Island
    Many Eucalypts are dead easy for drought tolerance once established.
    Cheers, LPN.
     
  4. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Victoria Australia [cool temperate]
    Most Australian natives if available survive on less water and don't like soils that are too rich. Some of the bottle brushes and grevillias for eg are really beautiful. Plants from South Africa and the Medditerranian area are also great. Not all things need heat many survive in a wide temperature range.

    Have a look at these pics of a dry landscape garden
    http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s1235751.htm

    http://www.bethchatto.co.uk/gravel.html

    A water saving garden wins Chelsea flowershow
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200605/s1645629.htm

    http://uktv.co.uk/gardens/stepbystep/aid/570391

    Here is another list for you to look at

    Agapanthus
    clivias
    rock lilly
    African daisy 'osteospermum'
    hebes
    diosma
    choisna
    gazania
    photina
    lavender
    Metrosideros Tomentosa (New Zealand Christams Tree)
    dietes
    lomandra
    correa
    pig face
    californian poppies
    nasturtium
    iris
    ceanothus Blue pacific
    Jacaranda
    Hymenosporum flavum (native frangipani)
    Hardenbergia

    Liz
     
  5. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Location:
    Ecuador SA Zone 12/13
    I'd add:
    devil's toungue spurges
    all varieties of aloe but especially vera and arborensis (if you don't go past -5)
    guitarilla (if you can find them, they grow well here in the humid desert biome of Ecuador)
    nopal and prickly-pear cactus
    all varieties of cholla
    blue-eyed grasses
    shallots (yes, you heard right. I'm growing them as flowers)

    and I'll second the acacias; but watch out, they can go invasive on you.
     
  6. wetcloud

    wetcloud Active Member

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    Location:
    Madrid, Spain zone 8
    This is my tree list of native and not native species that I look growing wild in Madrid, where we have very dry summers:
    Platanus hispanica (perhaps the most abundant tree of the city)
    Robinia pseudoacacia
    Gleditsia triacanthos
    Ailanthus altissima (A really invasive tree that is displacing native species)
    Celtis Australis
    Melia azederach
    Ulmus pumila (another invasive)
    Ulmus minor
    Acer campestre
    Aesculus hippocastanum (grows weakly without irrigation)
    Fraxinus angustifolia
    Populus alba/nigra (rarely farther than riverbanks)
    Cedrus species (deodara/atlantica/libani)
    Cupressus arizonica
    Cupressus sempervirens
    Pinus pinea
    Pinus Halepensis
    Thuja orientalis
    Quercus ilex
    Olea europea
    Eucaliptus camaldulensis
    Magnolia grandifolia (grows with less vigor without irrigation)
    Arbutus unedo
    Laurus nobilis

    And at high altitude zones of Madrid with cooler but still some dry summer:
    quercus pyrenaica
    Pinus sylvestris
    Pinus pinaster
    Juniperus communis (it sometimes seen at lower altitudes too)
    Ilex aquifolium
    Taxus baccata
    Populus tremula
    Corylus maxima
    A fews Betula alba, Acer pseudoplatanus, Fagus sylvatica, Abies alba...

    Not all trees of this second section can be recommended for Xeriscaping at all, just in regions with not much hot, rather short, dry summers and wet, cold weather the rest of the year.

    Best regards,

    Borja
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2008
  7. Sunbaked1

    Sunbaked1 Member

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    Location:
    mesa,az usa
    Here's another one. Leucophyllum frutescens(texas sage)
     
  8. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Location:
    Ecuador SA Zone 12/13
    Actually, most of the Salvias come to think of it...
     
  9. tropical

    tropical Active Member

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    Caribbean, West Indies
  10. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Location:
    Ecuador SA Zone 12/13
    Psidium guajava and its relatives also function well in xeriscapes.
     
  11. wetcloud

    wetcloud Active Member

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    Location:
    Madrid, Spain zone 8
    In my list I said 'Corylus maxima'. I wanted to say 'Corylus avellana'.
     
  12. alex66

    alex66 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    ROME Italy zone9/b
    Cistus!amazing!this year first season planted in soil, never watering !live with rain only...
     

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