Phyllosticta on my A. p. 'Shirazz'?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by kgeezy20, May 10, 2017.

  1. kgeezy20

    kgeezy20 Member Maple Society

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    Hi all,

    I was hoping someone could tell me what they thought the issue is with my A.p. 'Shirazz'. From what I've read, I'm thinking phyllosticta.
     

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  2. JT1

    JT1 Rising Contributor

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    If the tree is in it's first few seasons or was recently moved the brown spots can occur until it gets established. This variety tolerates full sun once established. My Shirazz (trade mark name, actual cultivar name is Acer palmatum 'Gwen's rose delight') grew lots of upward growing surface roots that would fill the original layer of mulch. Adding additional mulch, regular watering will help prevent the spread of brown spots. Planting something close by that will help shade the roots and keep them cool and from drying out too fast will also help.

    Less likely but still possible, is that you have an air pocket next to the root mass from planting. My Dad use to be one that resisted soil amendments. He thought why buy soil when you have plenty of native soil from the hole you dug. His soil was clumpy and when he back filled several air pockets were touching the roots. We discovered this after it was having lots of problems getting established and was eventually loosing branches. We replanted the tree and noticed all the air pockets that grew even larger with settling. My wife and I planted the tree properly and the tree made a full recovery. After the hard lesson learned, my Dad started using soil amendments when planting his future Japanese maples.

    If your tree has been doing fine for years and all the sudden you have spots, then we can consider more complicated problems, but if it's newly planted then experience with this variety tells me the problem is listed above.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2017
  3. kgeezy20

    kgeezy20 Member Maple Society

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    Thanks, JT. This actually is just its second spring, so I'd say you're right. I'm glad to hear it withstands sun once established, because it was totally bleached out last year by midsummer.
     
  4. JT1

    JT1 Rising Contributor

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    To help improve the trees ability to stand up to sun, get established faster, improve the leaf color, lengthen the spring and fall colors, and increase health, energy reserves, back budding, and fullness to the canopy. Oh and improve the soil health and the trees ability to take up moisture and nutrients. Use
    PHC ROOTS Plant Food with Microbes, 7-7-7, 40lb Bag.

    This is the only fertilizer that I can recommend for Japanese maples after years of research. You will get growth that is healthy and true to form. No long leggy shoots or reversion. You will get healthy sustainable growth, back budding and fullness. The tree will stand up to seasonal extremes. By the third season you will be amazed by the health and beauty of your trees. You will get longer lasting shows of color that you only thought were possible in the pictures used in books and online to sell these varieties.
    A.M. Leonard Tools for the Horticultural Industry since 1885.

     
  5. JT1

    JT1 Rising Contributor

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    Just a quick note on my post above, they offer free shipping (a few times a year) as a promotion if you can't find it locally. I use it for all container and landscape maples, shrubs, conifers, and perennials. I use it early spring, summer; in my area that's April 1st, end of June, and then September 1st I use:
    PHC® 3-4-4 Fertilizer for Acid-Loving Plants, 25 lb Bag

    A.M. Leonard Tools for the Horticultural Industry since 1885.

    As a winterizer. For all fertilizers I use half the recommend dose. It can be mixed in soil for re-potting and planting.

    A note about bacterial infections. Synthetic fertilizers fuel bacterial outbreaks. Do not use them. They also cause long leggy growth that is not true to form and can destroy the structure and character of your tree. The growth tends to only be at the tips making the tree look more sparse over time. The long shoots of growth caused by synthetic fertilizers are very porous and less dense increasing the likely hood of winter snow damage and wind damage. The branches tend to be more likely to die back over winter and the foliage tends to burn easier in the Summer heat. I find all this to be true even with the most expensive slow release synthetic fertilizers that cost more than $90 for 25lb bags. Reversion along with loss of spring color also have been a problem with synthetic fertilizer. My advice is never use them on Japanese maples and other slow growing ornamental trees and shrubs.
    PHC roots are the only fertilizers that I will recommend. PHC stands for plant health care.



    I used to be of the option that Japanese maples don't need fertilizer. That was until a wise man (Mr Shep aka Jim) told me that we tend to over fertilize our maples when they are young and then don't give them enough as they get older. At the time organic fertilizers left a lot to be desired, but in the past several years they have come along way and the best, I have found is PHC roots.

    There was a time that I was not comfortable recommending a fertilizer, but now I can with confidence.

    Note that I have no relationship with phc roots or am Leonard, I do not benefit in any way by my recommendation. I recommend it from my research and experience and I want to see other people have great success with their maples.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2017
    kgeezy20 likes this.
  6. kgeezy20

    kgeezy20 Member Maple Society

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    That says it all. I greatly appreciate all this excellent info, JT. You can bet that I will be ordering some ASAP.
     
  7. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I bought a 'Shirazz' last year ... if mine looked anything like yours I would be delighted. Leaves are small and insignificant. Whilst it is somewhat exposed |I am hoping it will develop as it settles in
     

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