Organic vs Chemical

Discussion in 'Organic Gardening' started by Wolvie150, Sep 14, 2008.

  1. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Bob2, Not really familiar here with the commercial mycorrhizae effects on maples and magnolias, but understand there is a symbiotic relationship between some types of mycorrhizae and rhododendrons , and also some orchid species. Some of the maple growers in the Maple Forum seem to feel their trees do better with the addition of mycorrhizae, not sure of which particular kinds of mycorrhizal fungi they are using. Guess a "search" of the forum would be informative.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2009
  2. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    I'm no expert on symbiotic fungi either but I have to wonder how well the study on damage to rhodies was, given the "nebularium" of chance happenings in the real world.

    If they are right they should be able to repeat the results.
    I'm just sayin...
     
  3. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Bob, not aware if there was a study done, seemed they thought the plants were doing better though. My understanding is that they were concerned of the effects on naturally occurring fungi, not commercial added fungi, of which both are mentioned in the article referrenced. Maybe somebody from UBC will be able to shed more light on this. Might be worthwhile somebody doing a study though, seems interesting, so much we don't know.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2009
  4. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Mycorrhizae is one of those products, that many, if not most, organic and non-organic gardeners, and growers, have heard about. Generally someone has passed along the information that they were told, that mycorrhizae works wonders when applied to transplants, and other garden situations. I guess, 90 percent of the people who have applied it, really do not fully understand what the "chemistry" of mycorhizae. They use it because they have been told it is the thing to do. I have used it on my grapes, 1-acre of wine grapes and a few table grapes, I suppose it is working, however, I cannot see the difference between the vines that I have applied it to, and the vines that I have not applied it to. I had some mycorrhizae for the 16 new Traminette vines I planted this spring, but forgot to apply it. The Traminette seem to adapt about the same as all the others. Perhaps, mycorrhizae works better on some things, then others. I really don't know for sure. - Millet (1,300-)
     
  5. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    Millet, your observations mirror my own. I guess I used to be more dependent on the advice of my retailer and the approval for sale by the Ag department.
    I have begun to feel that many products offered as "enhancers" to plant systems are unsubstantiated by reasonable research.
    Most of my best advice comes from people in the field such as you and the many folks that make a living with plants.
    It's one of the main reasons I review these forums on a continuing basis.

    Bob
     

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