need to cover big rocks

Discussion in 'Garden Design and Plant Suggestions' started by sharan, Jan 25, 2010.

  1. sharan

    sharan Member

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    hiya!

    i have these big rocks set up in rows in my garden, they were put there because it was a sloping garden at quite a seetp angle. there are three rows, i want to cover the bottom layer of rocks with a plant that will cascade down from the soil above them. the rocks are about 3-4 feet wide by two-three to four feet high. does anybody have any suggestions?
     
  2. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Ice plants (Aptenia, Drosanthemum, and Carpobrotus) are commonly used for that purpose here, and I believe they're hardy in Vancouver. Of the three, I think Aptenia is the prettiest, although Drosanthemum has showier flowers and Carpobrotus has the most interesting foliage.
     
  3. sharan

    sharan Member

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    i just checked those out on google, do they actually grow on the rock? and do you know if they are fast growing at all? thankyou so much for your reply :-)
     
  4. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    They do - they're planted directly on top of the rock on retaining walls here, and are super fast growers. Despite this, they cause no damage to the stone - just green covering.
     
  5. sharan

    sharan Member

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    that sounds great, ill have a look for them at my local nursery!! thankyou so much love!
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Most of those will not persist in Vancouver. If this is a sunny location with good drainage you may wish to try Arctostaphylos uva-ursi.
     
  7. sharan

    sharan Member

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    hiya ron! thankyou so much for your suggestion, do you know of anything that may have a bit more height that is good for this area?
     
  8. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Are each of the rocks 3 - 4 feet wide?

    Or the area of rocks?
     
  9. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    I like the Kinnikinnick suggestion.

    Arctostaphylos

    Prostrate Juniper wouldn't be one of my first choices. Some look nice. But in the long-term, I don't see many nice remnants.

    : - )
     
  10. sharan

    sharan Member

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    what do you guys think of aubretia and acacia cascade?

    p.s. thankyou so much for the input, i really do appreciate it
     
  11. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Acacia is normally a very agressive plant - check your local invasive species list before planting it. Aubrieta is gorgious, though.
     
  12. maf

    maf Well-Known Member Maple Society

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    Aubretia is a very good choice. It is often seen here in the UK planted in little nooks in the tops of stone walls and allowed to trail down, it always looks good in this situation and seems to thrive.
     
  13. sharan

    sharan Member

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    that sounds great- i like the look of english gardens :-)

    lorax- ill stay away from acacia if its invasive, i just got into gardening last year, and dont really want a high maintenance plant, thanks for the heads up!
     

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