Need Help Identifying three plants from a tv show.

Discussion in 'Conversations' started by rikudemyx, Aug 23, 2009.

  1. I was watching HBO's Rome and found many plants that catch my eye but there are three that I havent a clue what they are any help would be greatly appreciated.


    For the third photo the plant I need help with is the one in the bird bath.
     

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  2. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Contributor 10 Years

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    Welcome I just love it that while you are watching T.V. you are noticing the beautiful plants in the background! That shows real dedication. I am sure someone will soon id them.
     
  3. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    #2 looks like an Alocasia (Elephant's Ear) plant
     
  4. kevind76

    kevind76 Active Member

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    I do that all the time. You can tell if the producers really researched what they are filming about (eg. does this plant really grow in where the scene takes place?). Is that dedication or eccentric?
     
  5. togata57

    togata57 Rising Contributor

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    The former. You notice what interests you. A movie set in Africa should not include Asian elephants, or Bengal tigers, or koalas. Or Eastern white pines, either. Another thing we, as plant people, cannot fail to notice is plants/shrubs/trees shown as blooming at a time of year when (except in the case of some atmospheric cataclysm, or maybe a time warp) they would never do so. An unerasable personality trait: if you like plants, you notice them wherever they are.

    Yes, I too invariably notice plants in the background. Intense interview with a serial killer? Who cares? I want a better look at the nice phalaenopsis on the table behind the felon.
     
  6. nic

    nic Active Member

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    It works with textiles, too. I was much more interested in the pillows Kate Winslet was dying on, in Finding Neverland, than I was in her illness. But I do it with plants, too. There are certain types of film I can't watch with my husband because he mutters about military details being anachronistic, the classic family folklore one being "They didn't have stirrups then". So it must be a manifestation of an obsession, and clearly a healthy one.

    Sadly, I can't help with any of the plants.
     
  7. kevind76

    kevind76 Active Member

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    So true! Glad to hear there are others like this! Ah yes, the classic 'other worldly' Phalaenopsis - so are we to believe that Phals grow on other planets too? I guess it's kind of hard to plantscape another planet. How about the tropical landscape in a soundstage using Wal-Mart plants? I too have seen animals where they are not supposed to be. T.V. shows are not aimed at our type of people, so I guess they think they can get away with it, since thte majority of people either don't care, or don't notice.

    This is very off-topic, and I don't think we have answered the person's question. Sorry, I can't help with the ID.
     
  8. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Best guess is the second one is Alocasia odora. The species is from Southeast Asia but has been set free in much of the Caribbean, Central and South America, South Pacific as well as the Caribbean. It is very difficult to be certain without detailed photos. During the summer we have plants 12 feet tall with leaves up to 4 feet in our atrium.
     
  9. togata57

    togata57 Rising Contributor

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    I have a dear friend who has an encyclopedic knowledge of military history, esp. of uniforms, insignia, hats, plumes, cockades, and the like. Napoleonic, Civil War, Span-Am, ad infinitum. Owns a house full of antique uniforms, helmets, badges, buckles. Any movie he sees involving any aspect of same had BETTER be accurate...or I will hear about it. In detail! It's OK, though: I reciprocate in my own fields of it-must-be-correct, such as spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Nothing will rise my hackles faster than a ---aiee!---misplaced apostrophe. One of my philosophies (#2) is that Everyone Is A Nerd About Something. 'Nerd' meaning a subject in which the person so named is expert and through which finds his or her self-expression---and usually a subject unknown to 99.9% of the population. (Philosophy #1: The Purpose Of Life Is To Find One's Means Of Self-Expression.)

    We are neglecting our original call to action: what are the plants in photos 1 and 3? 1 is apparently some kinda palm; 3 is what? Spanish moss derivative? Misplaced watercress? Handfuls of Roman weed-pullings from a nearby atrium/agora, mayhap? Some artificial verdure, Jove forbid!!!---And what about those spiky plants in #3? Isn't there some sp. of yucca that sports those curly hairy tendril-like appendages visible in the photo?
     
  10. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

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    I can't see the plants in the bowl well enough to really see what they are - but, a good guess/substitute would be Kenilworth Ivy, (Linaria cymbalaria). (NOT AN IVY AT ALL.) They look very similar. They are European natives related to snapdragons, so that could be a possibility. Take a look on Google and see what you think. Barb
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2009
  11. nic

    nic Active Member

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    Unlikely to be in Imperial Rome, then. BBC HBO really don't care, do they?
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2009
  12. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Ivy is Hedera spp.; Linaria cymbalaria is an old synonym of Cymbalaria muralis (Ivy-leaved Toadflax). They do look vaguely similar, though the toadflax's leaves are much smaller (1-2cm across, compared to 5-12cm for ivies).
     

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