Identification: Mycena oregonensis?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by allelopath, Jul 30, 2017.

  1. allelopath

    allelopath Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    northern New Mexico, USA
    Southern Rocky Mountains in northern New Mexico USA.
    8000 ft asl. Near Big Tesuque Creek.
     

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  2. Frog

    Frog Well-Known Member Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Lovely mushroom find Allelopath!
    Not a familiar mushroom to me, I suspect it is not a PNW species.
    I'm also wondering if there could be a fungus, perhaps a Hypomyces or similar, growing on this mushroom? Did the yellow colour seem to you to be part of this mushroom or potentially a parastitic growth?
    If not that would certainly be a distinctive character for ID.
    thanks,
    frog
     
  3. allelopath

    allelopath Active Member 10 Years

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    I was wondering about its duotone appearance. If I see any again, how would I check for parasitic growth? Would it scrape off?
     
  4. Frog

    Frog Well-Known Member Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Scraping off most likely, but since some mushroom features can also scrape off, I'm thinking more along the lines of... if you look close up, perhaps with a handlens, does it seem to be a different structure than the mushroom, with its own edges of growth, or growth pattern? If you see more than one mushroom fruiting, does the yellow appear the same in each or do some have yellow patches and others not? Does the growth of the mushroom appear to be affected/altered by the yellow patches?
    Again, not looking familiar to me, so I'm not certain how to interpret this one. There are mushrooms with powdery and/or different coloured layers on stem or cap that are part of the mushroom itself.
     

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