More plants for Xeriscaping

Discussion in 'Gardening for Water Conservation' started by Annell, Aug 6, 2007.

  1. Annell

    Annell Active Member

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    I can't remember where i found this plant list, but it's got a lot of plants and I thought it would be helpful. I've found it to be for my own Xeriscaping work. I like that it's divided in to sections. I didn't create it, but got it from a website or book. I'm sorry i can't cite the source.

    The formating got lost when i cut and pasted it. if any wants me to email them a tidy copy laided out in columns, send me a note and i will.

    A.


    (edited by forum admin - the list is copyright another site, so I've altered it to only showing a small selection - please see the post below for the link to the complete list -- Daniel)

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 24, 2007
  2. Palias

    Palias Member

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  3. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    There's some there that I'd not consider drought-tolerant for semi-desert areas (e.g. Douglas-fir), and one or two that are listed as invasive species in North America too. Tamarix really shouldn't be in there, it's a dreadful weed in North America.
     
  4. Annell

    Annell Active Member

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  5. Annell

    Annell Active Member

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    It's good that you pointed that out. It's important to do some reasearch in to any plant that one puts in their garden, because some plants aren't native and are invasive. Thanks for mentioning it.

    A.
     
  6. unther

    unther Active Member

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    I invariably look first to my own native flora when selecting plants for a given site, xeriscapic or otherwise. Locally native plants will often do better than other non-native members of the same genus. For example, Acer circinatum (vine maple) and A. palmatum (Japanese maple) are for most intents and purposes horticulturally interchangable, but A. circinatum tolerates drought better, whereas I've seen a great many A. palmatum go extra-crispy, even when regularly irrigated. Natives have the added bonus of supplying habitat for local fauna that might not be able to utilize what to us might be a pretty darned close non-native equivalent. Butterfly larvae are notorious for being picky about what they eat. Admittedly, there's not always a "native for every occasion," as it were. For example, western North American flora is rather bereft of climbing vines. There are a few that sort of do the job, but even the most acrobatic of them are really clambering at best.
    It was indeed good to see a fair representation of native flora in that list. I've seen way too many plant lists for this or that which totally ignore western native flora and often North American flora in general. This is really unfortunate when we have such wonderfully ornamental genera such as Penstemon and Eriogonum that are endemic to North America and entire families such as Cactaceae that are nearly endemic to the Western Hemisphere and concentrated in North America.
     

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