Monarda Didyma refueling a humming bird

Discussion in 'Botany Photo of the Day Submissions' started by Yo_Jo, Aug 9, 2017.

  1. Yo_Jo

    Yo_Jo New Member

    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Hi Everyone,

    I thought I would try a photo submission. I originally submitted one of the photos with my monarda question but I wasn't sure how to link the post in the webpage so I will do it the old school way - cut and paste the link.

    Monarda Didyma Maintenance

    IMG-20170809-WA0000.jpg IMG-20170809-WA0016.jpg IMG-20170809-WA0003.jpg
    These images were taken with an iPhone 7 Plus about 1 meter from the plant, sitting very quietly.

    I was thinking that blooming time was almost over because the deck has been stained red with all the pedals falling off but it still seems it has more to offer this season.

    I have been fascinated with how the birds and insects interacts with the monarda didyma plant. If the monarda evolved this way to feed the birds what is it getting in return for this service? Fertilizer during feedings?

    Regards

    Joe
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    8,755
    Likes Received:
    91
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    That phone has quite the camera, doesn't it? Thanks.
     
  3. Yo_Jo

    Yo_Jo New Member

    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Yeah the wife loves the iPhone 7 Plus. Nowadays even a non techie can take stunning photos. Just point and click.
    Sadly, most of the Monarda pedals have fallen off and all the hummingbirds have disappeared this week - I haven't seen any buzzing about.
    Perhaps they have all flown south for the winter or there is a really fat cat in the neighbourhood.
     
  4. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member

    Messages:
    669
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    Daytona Beach, FL USA
    Don't mean to be pedantic, but the birds and bees are pollinating while they are feeding on nectar. They go from flower to flower and fertilize them so they will produce viable seed. It's likely that they are covered in pollen dust from many flowers visited that day, and probably many species. Natural selection would be in favor of plants that attract the most pollinators. We humans stepped in and selectively bred for the various traits we liked.

    Fertilizing during feeding is very uncommon in plant-animal partnerships. There are carnivorous plants and others like bromeliads that get a nutritional kick from their animal visitors but most flowers don't really get anything save a way to spread their genes.
     

Share This Page