Magnolia sargentiana var. robusta

Discussion in 'Photographs' started by Daniel Mosquin, Feb 21, 2003.

  1. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    8,842
    Likes Received:
    105
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    UBC Accession #27010-0317-1987
    Photo by Daniel Mosquin
    Entrance (near boardwalk)
    February 21, 2003

    A full month earlier than last year! The flower is right in the middle.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 11, 2003
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    8,842
    Likes Received:
    105
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Same accession.

    Photographer: Daniel Mosquin
    March 3, 2003.
     

    Attached Files:

    • mag2.jpg
      mag2.jpg
      File size:
      78.2 KB
      Views:
      639
  3. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    8,842
    Likes Received:
    105
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Same accession
    March 7, 2003
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    8,842
    Likes Received:
    105
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Some photos from the first flowers of 2004
    Same accession
    Photos by Daniel Mosquin
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    8,842
    Likes Received:
    105
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Same accession

    January 7, 2005
    Photo by Daniel Mosquin
    Canon S40
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Honeysuckle

    Honeysuckle Active Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Texas, US
    These are lovely! I love pink magnolias!
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    19,157
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    This species is one of the most spectacular in flower. The fallen leaves are a source of interest in the Seattle arboretum, as the outer rim, veins and stalk persist after the tissue between has disappeared.

    There is a 'Blood Moon' comparatively near the entrance - although I wouldn't say it was along the boardwalk - might the specimen shown be one of those? In these photos it seems to have the same 'Diva' like coloring of that cultivar (based on one so-labeled in Lam Garden), rather than the less reddish pigmentation usually seen.
     
  8. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    8,842
    Likes Received:
    105
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Not sure - this is definitely a plant along the boardwalk, though.

    In the accession system, it is actually listed as M. sargentiana var. robusta (dark form) (which we'll write these days as dark-flowered selection).
     
  9. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    19,157
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Callaway (1994):

    "'Chyverton Dark' Flowers fuchsia in bud, mauve when open. Listed by Treseder's Nurseries, Cornwall, England, ca. 1973; cultivated at Chyverton, Cornwall, England."

    Gardiner (2000):

    "'Chyverton Dark Form' and 'Chyverton Pale Form' were selected by Nigel Holman of Chyverton, Zelah, Cornwall. The former has deep purple buds..."

    Since, like M. campbellii, this species varies from white to purple maybe there is a case for at least adding 'dark-flowered selection' to the title of this thread to indicate the specimen shown is of a particular type, even if it cannot be verified that it is the clone from Chyverton.
     
  10. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,424
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    I would think to include 'dark-flowered selection' for the title
    of this thread would be wrong to do. Coming a nurseryman's
    view that selected out the seedling and in some cases saw a
    difference from the cutting (which happens with Sargentiana,
    much more so with the seldom any more seen species form),
    grew it on and then outlet the plant to an arboretum, we would
    call it simply dark form. It is already assumed it is a selected
    form.

    There is an acknolwedged dark form of 'Robusta' so if the dark
    form let's say at Strybing is not the same plant as the UBC has
    then we need to know the sourcing of the plant at the Botanical
    Garden to see if we are on the same playing field. I know where
    the plant came from that has been at Strybing for a while and
    who selected it out. Another thing worth mentioning is that
    the dark form at Strybing and the one at Filoli from the same
    source (both are from cuttings) have flowers that are not quite
    the same color as one will fade to a light silvery pink faster than
    the one at Strybing will. In bud they are about the same color,
    very similar to the emerging flower in the first photo above.
    A lot is due to direct sunlight as the one at Strybing is protected
    by several Campbellii in a Southwestern exposure and the one
    at Filoli is in a non-protected Southern exposure. What I am
    saying is that we cannot rely on color from plant to plant as
    the coloring can change on us depending on how much sunlight
    the plant gets and the plants exposure alone.

    Jim
     
  11. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    8,842
    Likes Received:
    105
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Messing things up even more with photographs is getting the colour exactly right - in appreciating the subtlety of differences sometimes, you almost need a side-by-side comparison (unless you can standardize the photo against a grey card + have perhaps the RHS colour codes at your disposal).

    We try to avoid using zzzz-flowered or yyyy-leaved form at the garden, as an attempt to not confuse the botanical forma. Occasionally we use "selection" or "ecotype". I'm not saying it's the best solution to the problem, but I'd be happy to continue a discussion on that particular topic in the Plant Names and Taxonomy forum...
     
  12. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,424
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    I wrote silvery pink for a reason as the dark form
    of this Magnolia can turn that color for us down
    here. The RHS color standard will not be of much
    help for these plants as many of these plants people
    claim to have in England did not have their origins
    there, although several were indeed raised, selected
    out and grown in England. No question about that.

    When we deal with color forms of 'Robusta' we have
    to keep in mind that there are more than one shade
    of color that these plants will have of the dark, light
    and intermediate forms. The higher degree of color
    variance is in the intermediate forms. People just
    have not seen these color variants in arboretums
    and botanical gardens to know them. They had to
    go to the sources and see them in bloom growing
    side by side and then still did not want to accept
    what their eyes were seeing.. After the explosion
    from the Felix Jury hybrids, people started taking
    the ball from the sources and ran with it but they
    started thinking too much. Thinking in terms of
    elements they were seeing that they wanted and
    hoped they were seeing without consulting the
    people that actually grew and selected out the
    plant to ask them what is going on as they did
    not need us any more or so they thought!

    Jim
     
  13. Michael15r

    Michael15r Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Stockton, California
    I love this tree so much!

    It's really beautiful during the spring with it's large flowers. I wanted to grow one of these in my backyard, but then I thought why when I would have to also rake during the spring time since all the flowers fall at the same time causing a huge mess!.. But one great looking flower tree I'll say that! Nice pictures!
     
  14. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    19,157
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Pets have to be cleaned up after, whereas trees do not. Wow and amaze your friends: plant a magnolia.
     
  15. john82

    john82 Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    trees also need to be cleaned after - but only about once a year!!
    pets do need much more cleaning after i agree...
    i think i'll take your advice about planting a magnolia, after seeing all these lovely pictures here.
    at what age do these trees start to bloom?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 17, 2008
  16. Donald King

    Donald King Member

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Issaquah, WA
    I think that by using parens with a lower case qualifier, one could indicate that this particular tree has darker flowers than the norm. It does not indicate that it is or is not vegetatively related to the other tree. Before getting too fine with shades of colors, there are many factors that affect the intensity of a shade. On my M. 'Vulcan', the later, higher flowers are lighter shades than the lower, earlier flowers. Thus, my M.'Vulcan' does not exhibit a particular shade, per se.
     
  17. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    19,157
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    That one is variable anyway, sometimes not producing reddish flowers. This has been associated with cool climate conditions, yet I have seen both reddish and non-reddish flowered ones here in the same area. My own specimen, a beanpole by now getting fairly tall has never had good color.
     
  18. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

    Messages:
    5,721
    Likes Received:
    134
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC Canada
    Different accession, but I want to show the Magnolia sargentiana fruit in a thread with the flowers, and I would expect them to look the same.

    Accession: 022601-5236-1984
    Location: South side of the boardwalk, near the fence, area 3AA6
    Date: September 7, 2012
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page