Made myself a cup of coffee tonight

Discussion in 'Conversations' started by pinenut, May 7, 2007.

  1. pinenut

    pinenut Active Member 10 Years

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    Only took me 25 or 30 years. I grew the tree, "harvested" twenty cherries, fermented them, pulped them, dried them, roasted (toasted more like) them in a frying pan, ground them and made myself a cup of coffee.
    Got my wife to taste it.
    One of us puts it somewhere between Tim Hortons and burnt rubber, and the other thinks it tastes pretty much like a Starbucks dark roast.
    I'm only posting this because I'm so pleased with myself.
    Carl
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Inside the house?
     
  3. pinenut

    pinenut Active Member 10 Years

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  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Very nice! Bet there's not too many folks in Whitehorse who could say the same.
     
  5. pinenut

    pinenut Active Member 10 Years

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    There are two roasters here, but you're right. Not too many folks grow their own.
    Carl
     
  6. Laughing Dog

    Laughing Dog Active Member

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    Carl, that is a great story ... congratulations. With my wife and I being huge coffee lovers it gives us food for thought. Maybe we shall try something similar, just to experience the "process" ... kinda of increases your appreciation for coffee beans.

    Where did you get a suitable coffee plant?
     
  7. pinenut

    pinenut Active Member 10 Years

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    Some plant stores have them, but I've no idea where on the island. Try asking Junglekeeper. I had the impression that they were pretty commonly available. I'm also growing them from my own beans.
    Carl
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    A coffee shop near here has a plant covered with beans, haven't asked for background information.
     
  9. Gordo

    Gordo Active Member

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    Visited coffee country (Panama) a couple years ago. The small growing operation, run by a couple originally from Vancouver, B.C., had a roasting machine manufactured in Burlington, Washington. Small world, this coffee processing stuff.

    Regards,

    Gordo
     
  10. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Contributor 10 Years

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    I'm not familiar with sources for plants on the island but I suggest checking with places that sell tropicals ranging from garden centers and nurseries to florist sections in supermarkets and grocery stores. Coffee plants are often sold in 4" pots with several seedlings to a pot; other sizes are less common.
     
  11. pinenut

    pinenut Active Member 10 Years

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    And if all else fails, I can send you a couple of mine. They're scruffy leftovers, but they're survivors.
    Carl
     
  12. Laughing Dog

    Laughing Dog Active Member

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    After searching around locally without much luck, I managed to find an online source via the Whatcom Seed Company. They state the following:

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Arabica accounts for about 75% of the world coffee production and is the coffee that specialty roasters search for. Coffea arabica is easy to grow indoors, makes a very attractive houseplant and if it likes you well enough it will even reward you with flowers and berries. A six-foot plant can produce two to four pounds of coffee a year. Grow in medium light, or filtered or indirect sunlight. Use a rich, acid soil kept moderately moist. Peat moss in the potting mix will help provide acid conditions. Ideal temperatures are between 60 and 85 degrees. Give the roots room to grow. Hardy to 28F.[/FONT]

    They also sell a dwarf variety, which is described as follows:

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Coffea catura is an outstanding, dwarf arabica variety, which is a heavy bearer that does not require shading. Grows just 24" - 30" in height. In addition to producing the finest coffee beans, Coffea catura makes a splendid houseplant or, in warm climates, may be grown outdoors as an ornamental. Does not tolerate frost. The lush foliage is deep glossy green and noticeably ridged, giving the leaves an embossed appearance. Extremely handsome![/FONT]

    And there third option is the Kona variety:

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Kona coffee is considered to be among the finest gourmet coffees in the world. This small tree has dark green, glossy leaves. This coffee is easy to grow indoors and makes a very attractive houseplant. Clusters of white, fragrant flowers, followed by bright red beans. Often will begin to produce in just four years and can yield over a pound of coffee a year! Grow in medium light, or filtered or indirect sunlight. Use a rich, acid soil kept moderately moist. Peat moss in the potting mix will help provide acid conditions. Ideal temperatures are between 60 and 85 degrees. Give the roots room to grow. Hardy to 28F.[/FONT]

    I think I will start by trying the last one - the Kona I have tried at coffee shops have always been amongst of preferred coffee.
     
  13. keaganp

    keaganp Active Member

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    I just bought a coffee plant for 2 bucks. I'm so excited, but it's a little baby
     
  14. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member

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    Years ago my dad came by a bag of unroasted beans from a mate. He got an old frypan and drilled holes in it and proceeded to roast the beans over the open hole of a slow combustion wood stove. No idea what it tasted or smelt like but I am pretty sure it was ok as he eventualy did the whole lot.

    Liz
     
  15. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Liz, that's almost exactly how small batches are done here in Ecuador - we use drilled-bottom brass or copper pailas (large bowls) and then toss the beans over slow charcoal embers. When this is being done, you can smell it all the way up the valley.
     

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