I inherited a grapevine

Discussion in 'Grapes and Grape Vines' started by cmg214, Oct 14, 2008.

  1. cmg214

    cmg214 Member

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    Hi,
    My new home came with an established grapevine, growing on a car port like trellis. there are grapes everywhere on the ground. I know nothing about grapevines, but would like to start cultivating this one, so as to make use of it's fruits. There is only one "trunk" which is about six feet tall. There are many vines twisted and gnawled around each other. Also I live in New England, in Rhode Island (doesn't seem like a native grape growing climate??)
    Can anyone guide me as to where to start?
    Thanks,
    Christina
     
  2. jonesboybrian

    jonesboybrian Member

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    what kind are they if you don't know what color are the grapes
     
  3. cmg214

    cmg214 Member

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    not sure what type of grapes they are, but they are purple in color.
     
  4. jonesboybrian

    jonesboybrian Member

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    they my be a niagara
     
  5. cmg214

    cmg214 Member

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    hmm, I haven't even heard of that variety. I assumed they were Concord as that seems to be the most prevalent in this area. Actually when I looked at the vine last night, there were some green ones as well, but I suspect that they were just ripened enough.
     
  6. jonesboybrian

    jonesboybrian Member

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    It very well be a concord grapes are tricky to identify but concord is a good grape Niagara vines aren't very common but i believe they but if you said they are still greenish niagara are called the white concord they are greenish sometimes they look a little purple
     
  7. cmg214

    cmg214 Member

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    does the varietal matter in regards to pruning? That is my main goal, to be able to prune the vine effectively for next spring.....
     
  8. Margaret

    Margaret Active Member 10 Years

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    You may find help in the grapevine forum. I search the thread started under "Extremely overgrown grapevines" from March 5th 2005 and I think that this will help. I also inherited very mature vines which are used both for fruit but also to shade both levels of our home. The photo was taken from the second story. In my very limited experience it seems to be quite difficult to kill a grapevine!
    Very good luck.
    margaret
     
  9. iammotown

    iammotown Member

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    check out this site www.bunchesgrapes.com his name is lon rombough. i bought his book "the grape grower" and jeez it was a college course - except in english. this guy turned my curiousity into a fascination. if anyone can help you learn about grapes, pruning, training, and saving vines it would be him. there is a post section on this sight. also if you go into his catalog, he has some pictures of different varieties, that might help. Are they any good? my thoughts would be to learn how to prune your vine based on the state its in. when a vine is overgrown, not enough nutrients get to the right places on the vine and the tannins and sugars and ph just aren't right in the fruits. so it would be hard to tell if the the vine was worth the trouble if the fruits dont taste like they should. some vines do alright though when they grow wild like that. i would taste the grapes as soon as you see more ripened ones and if you like them the way they are, maybe all you need is some trim work.
     
  10. Pasquale

    Pasquale Active Member

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    Hi.CMG214
    In my old country Italy there is a saying about the grapevine: Leave me poor and I will make you rich. This is what I would suggest: Cut all the new growth down to the second nod from the main runner, complete the pruning by cutting all the thin cane leaving only 10 or 20 of the best-one. And this, depend on the size of the vine.
     
  11. KMG

    KMG Member

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    I live in Massachusetts (just over the line from RI)

    What is the common rule of thumb for the winter, put mulch around the base or leave bare? Red grapes, planted in May 2008 and climbed about six feet, one stalk this season (birds ate before I got a chance). Want to give it a second chance.
     
  12. Pasquale

    Pasquale Active Member

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    Hi KMG
    You will have a second chance only: If the birds will leave you some! For the last ten years we have the Racoons that take it all. Your vine should survive the winter without any protection, but since it is a young plant it will do no harm to cover it around the base with 4-5 of leaves or straw.
     

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