how to grow a mango plant from seed

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by dogseadepression, Feb 15, 2006.

  1. lkailburn

    lkailburn Active Member

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    I'm glad one of them sprouted. The first of my champagne mango's broke the ground yesterday and is working it's way towards being perfectly upright. I'll be sure to grab a picture of it soon. Post a photo of yours if you can

    -Luke

    EDIT: including a photo, you can see one of the lychee sprouts on the left, and the new baby mango sprout on the right
     

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    Last edited: Jul 6, 2011
  2. GoCanes

    GoCanes Member

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    Hey! After enjoying mangos a couple of weeks ago i decided that i was going to take on planting 2 mangos with my 9 year old sister. I used three seeds. One seed i planted it straight in a pot with soil without taking off the husk. With the second seed, i took off the husk and planted it in the soil. The third seed i took off the husk and used the toothpick/cup of water technique for germination. Living in miami, it appears that the bacteria killed the third seed.The other two seeds however are growing flawlessly. I planted the seeds about a week and a half ago and they are already growing roots, when can my sister and I expect them to sprout out of the soil? Thanks in Advance!
     
  3. lkailburn

    lkailburn Active Member

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    mine seem to take about 3 weeks from the time i put it in dirt to the time its sprouts above the surface of soil. i bet if you had them on a constant heat source you could get them to sprout faster.

    -Luke
     
  4. buells1

    buells1 Member

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    Hi Luke,
    I think I must have the slowest germinating mango, it is alive but it's so slow to put out the 1st set of leaves but I can see them,just. The other seed has changed colour, it's green now so I guess that one is trying to grow.
    Fiona
     
  5. visarlene

    visarlene Member

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    My mango tree grown from seed is now 3 years old and 8 feet tall! I am absolutely amazed at how it has grown. You can see the progression by looking at the pictures I have posted here. Hopefully this will encourage everyone to keep at it. Of course I am still waiting for the day that it bears fruit, hopefully in a few more years. Good luck to all!
     

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  6. lkailburn

    lkailburn Active Member

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    That looks great! Look at that trunk!. Thank you for sharing the updated photo with us.

    -Luke
     
  7. visarlene

    visarlene Member

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    I pruned the tree per Lorax's instructions (see Sept/Oct 2010) removing all the bottom branches, so now there is the one main trunk that splits in two as shown in the photo. I have never had much of a green thumb, so I am delighted that this mango seems to be happy and thriving.
     

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  8. lkailburn

    lkailburn Active Member

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    Looks Great!

    So here's something odd. I planted two champagne mangos (not sure exact cultivar) seeds, from the same box of fruit. Both fruit, had just a single seed. The first one came up with one sprout. The second came up with two sprouts.(see photo). Now i've heard mango cultivars that grow true to seed are polyembryonic not mono. Is that multiple sprouts per seed, or multiple seeds per fruit? Is there a chance either of these, or both, sprouts will grow true to the parent tree?

    Thanks!

    -Luke
     

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  9. visarlene

    visarlene Member

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    I don't have the answers you seek, but your result is fascinating. Please keep us posted on the progress.
     
  10. mandana

    mandana Member

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    Hi Guys,

    I'm new to this forum. I had two mango seeds and wanted to plant them so I came up with this thread. I've found it really inspiring. Especially when I saw the 3 years progress of Visarlene's mango. Looks lovely. My mango's will be three weeks old in two days time and I will update you with pics soon.
     
  11. mandana

    mandana Member

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    Ok, here is my mango story:

    3 weeks ago I bought two mangoes from the market. They were one of those long ripe yellow ones, I don't know the type. After eating the fruits, I left the stones in the sun to dry them and then opened the husks and placed the seeds in two separate glasses of water with the pointed ends down. kept them in a dark airy cupboard and changed the water every day. They both sprouted in less than 2 weeks (2 first attachments) and after a day of indirect sun light I pot them and left them outside (third attachment). Now they are 20 days old (forth attachment).

    I'm happy with them so far, however I am a bit concern about the #1. It starts germinating sooner than #2 and until 3 days ago they were growing fast together but it has stooped growing tall since and the leafs aren't as shiny as they were. Is that normal?

    Here we have very hot and dry summers and cold winters with frost and snow. I know that mangoes are so cold sensitive but has anyone ever heard about a mango tree that has survived snow and frost?

    Thanks,
    Mandana
     

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  12. lkailburn

    lkailburn Active Member

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    Great photos! Definitely a different variety of mango than we get here. Don't be surprised if they grow at different rates. I sprouted three of the same type of mangos at the same time. They all sprouted on exactly the same day, but each grew slightly different then the others. I have never heard of a mango variety surviving a frost or snow.

    Keep up the good work.

    I will post up photos of all of mine in a short bit. In the mean time, can anyone identify this disease/issue. I assume it is anthracnose, but i have treated the plant twice with copper spray, (seen in the photos as the white residue). The copper spray seems to have finally slowed the progression but looking for more input if available.

    Thanks,

    -Luke
     

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  13. ilmenc

    ilmenc Member

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    Hi everybody,

    My Mango is growing with my new system as below;


    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]

    I keep the bottle indoor at night, to protect from cold air...
    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Come easy to you,

    Mr. Engin
     
  14. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Luke, it sure looks like Anthracnose to me.
     
  15. ilmenc

    ilmenc Member

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    No, it is quite good..
     
  16. lkailburn

    lkailburn Active Member

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    Thanks Lorax,
    I'll try to be dilligent with the copper spray

    -Luke
     
  17. mandana

    mandana Member

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    Hi everybody,

    My mangoes are progressing well, however there is a new issue! I've noticed some gray spots on mango #1's leaf yesterday. And to my surprise it has turned brown and spread to all the green leaves today. This evening I've found some gray spots on #2 as well! It wasn't like this in the morning!

    Anyone knows what is it? What's the cause? how can I treat it?
     

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    Last edited: Aug 18, 2011
  18. lkailburn

    lkailburn Active Member

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    yikes, sorry i am not sure what that is. hopefully someone more knowledgable can chime in and help you out. It's not sunburn is it?

    -Luke
     
  19. mandana

    mandana Member

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    Thanks Luke.

    I've sent photos to someone with agricultural knowledge too and she told me the same. she said it's sunburn caused by hot and dry climate. Looks that I have to provide them some humidity!!!
     
  20. kiwibrah

    kiwibrah Member

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    Interesting. I had the exact same thing happen to mine, which actually killed the plant. Hope yours pull through. After it had died I dug it up and had found that the tap root was broken in half about 7 inches down. Don't know how this happened or if that had anything to do with it. My plant was also about the same stage of growth as yours.

    Good to see an update on visarlenes tree. What a beauty.

    I'm having another crack at growing them again this summer. I've started early this time round hoping they can put on some good growth before it gets too cold.
     
  21. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Luke, apologies for not seeing this question! Polyembriony in mangoes means that you get multiple sprouts per seed, but only one seed per fruit; you've got a close to 100% chance that your seedlings are true to their mother tree(s).
     
  22. aliban

    aliban Member

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    I just thought I'd share a discovery with my fellow mango-farmers ;-)
    YOU CAN SPROUT YOUR MANGO SEEDS IN A WORM COMPOST BIN
    About a week ago, I was digging around a bit in my worm compost bin to make room for more kitchen scraps, and I noticed that the mango pits I had thrown in there ages ago had not only been eaten clean by the worms (they LOVE mango), but had also cracked open and were sprouting in the dark, moist, goopy environment provided by the worm compost bin!
    I took out a few of the pits and put them into pots (one each) and so far 2 of them have continued to grow - one even sprouted some nice shiny leaves and seems to be thriving.
    I'm not sure what to do next - am currently putting them out in the sunshine all day (it's still warm here in Vancouver) and bringing them inside at night.
    I read that they need to be kept really warm, and since I like it warm too, my apartment should always be warm enough for them in the winter... I'm just wondering about fertilizer & if there is going to be enough light for them during the murky Vancouver winter.
    Anybody have any words of wisdom?
     

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  23. lkailburn

    lkailburn Active Member

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    Thanks for the info! That would be great, as the fruit was fantastic. However, one of the sprouts died already and the other is having a tough time. Not sure why. Of all my mango sprouts this one is having the toughest time.

    By the way, the one with the anthracnose has pulled through, don't see any more signs of it.

    -Luke
     
  24. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Try building your struggling sprout a humitidy tent. I'm not sure how big the pot is, but this is normally easy to do by simply putting a few bamboo skewers in the pot and popping a large zipper baggie overtop. If the pot's too big for that, then you can use plastic wrap to the same effect, supporting it on the skewers.

    See if that perks it up.
     
  25. lkailburn

    lkailburn Active Member

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    Thanks for the tip! the little guy is actually in my mini-greenhouse. One of those 5'tall x 3' wide x 2' thick, 5 tier ones. It sits inside, next to a large south facing window, for the shelves that aren't directly exposed to the window, there is a 2' growlight. This is the shelf that the mango is on. It does get pretty humid in there since it is zipped up most of the day and misted daily. It's where I sprout, and keep some of my tropicals. It might actually need to be repotted though, i'll pull it up and check the root. Those taproots get big quick!!

    -Luke
     

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