How many Deciduous Conifer's are there?

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by Mirek, Feb 26, 2008.

  1. Mirek

    Mirek Member

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    I'm from Southwestern Ontario. I was wondering how many Deciduous Conifers there are. I know there's a Tamarack which is a Tall growing spruce like tree with green needles in the summer. In the winter the needles change to a yellow color and then fall off in the winter time.

    Does anyone know of any other Deciduous Conifer in the Southern part of Ontario?

    Thanks

    Mirek
     
  2. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Do you mean naturally growing, there, or just in general?

    Like Ginkgo?

    Dawn redwood?

    Bald cypress?

    Larch grows naturally in our Oregon mountains too.
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Total for the world. Note that not all of these are grown in Ontario.

    Pinaceae:


    Larix (larches; 13 species)
    Larix decidua (European Larch)​

    Larix sibirica (Siberian Larch)​

    Larix gmelinii (Dauhurian Larch)​

    Larix kaempferi (Japanese Larch)​

    Larix principis-rupprechtii (Prince Rupprecht's Larch)​

    Larix himalaica (Langtang Larch)​

    Larix griffithii (Himalayan Larch)​

    Larix kongboensis (Kongbo Larch)​

    Larix potaninii (Potanin's Larch)​

    Larix mastersiana (Masters' Larch)​

    Larix lyallii (Subalpine Larch)​

    Larix occidentalis (Western Larch)​

    Larix laricina (Tamarack Larch)​
    Pseudolarix amabilis (Golden Larch)

    Cupressaceae:


    Taxodium (baldcypresses; 2 species deciduous, a third evergreen)
    Taxodium distichum (Bald Cypress)​

    Taxodium ascendens (Pond Cypress)​
    Metasequoia glyptostroboides (Dawn Redwood)

    Glyptostrobus pensilis (Chinese Swamp Sypress)

    Ginkgoaceae:

    Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgo; not really a conifer)
     
  4. levilyla

    levilyla Active Member

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    I always heard that Ginkgo WAS a conifer even though it does not look like one. Do you mean it really is NOT one now?
     
  5. smivies

    smivies Active Member

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    A Ginkgo is a gymnosperm and so are all the conifers, but a Ginkgo is not a conifer.

    Simply defined flowering plants are angiosperms. Correctly though, the distinction between gymnosperms and angiosperms is made by the type of seed they bear. Wiki has a good explanation....
     
  6. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yep, Ginkgo is (slightly!) more closely related to cycads than it is to conifers.
     
  7. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    It's interesting that Larch has so many species.

    I'm curious about how subtle the differences are between them.
     
  8. Mirek

    Mirek Member

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    Thats it?? wow, i need to collect a cutting from a deciduous conifer for next week. as it looks like a tamarack is the best option for me right now. The only problem with this is that all the branches are very brital. (larix laricina K.Koch)

    Does anyone know of any other plant that would be better used to take a clipping from and press it on a piece of paper?

    Thanks

    Mirek


     
  9. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I'd think Larix laricina is the only one that will be at all common in Ontario. The next commonest will probably be Larix decidua, then Metasequoia glyptostroboides and Taxodium distichum, these getting distinctly hard to find (likely only in places where you'll need to get special permission to pick twigs).

    Larch twigs are not very brittle unless they've been dead a year or two (after that, they do get very brittle). Maybe you picked a dead twig from low down on a tree's crown, when all the live growth is higher up?
     
  10. Mirek

    Mirek Member

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    ya i did pick it from the bottom. i'm going to have to put on my tree climbing gear and get a live clipping from the top.
     
  11. KarinL

    KarinL Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Use a pole pruner!
     
  12. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Or look for a young specimen!
     
  13. Mirek

    Mirek Member

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    i've been climbing trees in southwestern ontario cities for the last 3 years. i havent really seen a young tamarack yet. maybe i havent noticed it yet.
     
  14. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    More likely to see young ones out in the wild, than in cities!

    Good on you on the climbing ;-))
    but don't go climbing larches, they're not very safe!
     
  15. Mirek

    Mirek Member

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    ya i know, tell me about it.. :)
     
  16. levilyla

    levilyla Active Member

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    lol Did you fall out of one? So Ginkgo is a gymnosperm. Why do people always say this is the only conifer that does not look like one (and I mean "lecturerers"). Apparently extracts from the Gingko help symtoms of insufficient blood circulation to the brain, including memory loss and confusion. I think I may need some.
     
  17. Carol Paul

    Carol Paul New Member

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    The Dawn Redwood is deciduous and recently introduced into the U.S.
    Botanical name: Metasequoia glyptostroboides

    I understand this was once thought extinct, but it is supposedly native to the Sichuan–Hubei region of China and was rediscovered in 1944. It will grow to 200'. It has beautiful bark, but all the shedding every fall is a mess.
     

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