How long does a weeping willow live for?

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by janeevans@ihug.co.nz, May 19, 2005.

  1. Can anyone tell me please how long a weeping willow will live for. I have one that is at least 35 years old that is threatening power lines. It has some fist size holes and some die back of branches and i don't know whether to cut it down or prune it. Pruning it would be an expensive excercise if it wasn't going to last much longer anyway. The country is New Zealand.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years of Activity

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    Have an International Society of Arboriculture Certified Arborist do a Hazard Tree Evaluation. The current condition of the tree is what counts, not how long it might live (a variable number, same as with humans).
     
  3. shelly

    shelly Member

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    It's funny to see this question . I just came inside from my yard, after seeing my willow tree uprooted and laying all over my backyard as if a tornado blew through. 3 months ago , my other willow cracked over about 3 feet above the ground level. Both trees were alive however both were planted by me in 1967, so 40 years or so and that was it for both trees. I'm not a horticulturist, just my own personal experience in the last 3 months. Big, giant, living trees and both gone. We had huge rains 3 days ago and then huge winds and that's what happened to cause its demise. The first one that went around Christmas was bizarre since it cracked and fell and left a 3-4 foot stump. Very strange. Hope this helps. Shelly
     
  4. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member

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    Had one that cracked off next door and just left a stem. (20 odd years ago) it is now a large beautifull tree again. If it were mine I would trim it back hard and it will re sprout. Shape it away from the wires to keep it safe. I have seen them cut back along the creeks here and they come back. You can stick a branch into damp soil and it will grow.

    Liz
     
  5. shelly

    shelly Member

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    I thank you so much. I actually did not think about that and I should have. I have a Bradford Pear that was supposed to be cut down due to a neighbor's complaint and I told him to leave a 3 ft stump for me to use to put a flower pot on. Instead he left about 6 feet and it re-sprouted and is now a beautiful tree again. So I should have remembered but I didn't until your message. Thanks, will do and hopefully it will re-grow. shelly
     
  6. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Under a power line is not a grand place for one of those whether it would live a long time or not.

    It it lasted for some decades, the maintenance tends to grow as the top section has to be cut lower.

    Either way, whether it stays or gets cut down, it's going to cost money.

    If you remove it from under the power lines now, it should be a lot less expensive that doing it later when it's larger.
     
  7. GranInOregon

    GranInOregon Member

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    I had one that was probably planted when my house was built in 1955. I had a new neighbor homeowner and she had her tenant cut down, probably 45 = 50' willow and left about a 10 ' stump, with a chain saw. It did eventually regrow limbs but it was never the same. Part of it eventually died and ended up with a big hole in the middle but the darn thing kept growing.
    It was more trouble than it was worth so we just cut it all down and dug out the roots. However, not before I took limbs and started new trees. One, after 20 years is a good 20-25' tall. Off that one I took probably a 6" limb, stuck it in the ground and this will be our third summer and its at least 12-14'. Very fast growers, great shade tree.
    The only bad part but guess its necessary is during the winter if there are any little dead limbs, they break off all over the yard. Its better than having to go up and trim it.
    Hoope this helps.
     

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