Oaks: How do I graft a White Oak tree?

Discussion in 'Fagaceae (beeches, oaks, etc.)' started by rockjock4rdg, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. rockjock4rdg

    rockjock4rdg Member

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    I have a White Oak tree on my property that is 10 to 15 years old. It is growing in a V shape. It has a 4 foot strait trunk and then splits to a V.

    I was wondering if it is possible to graft a bridge between the two branching sections of the tree to prevent it from breaking apart in the distant future?

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks -Adam
     
  2. rockjock4rdg

    rockjock4rdg Member

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    grafting White Oak

    So the counter shows that my original posted question was looked at 64 times.

    Any suggestions on where to find some literature or web sites? From what I have found on my own suggests that the White Oak is a good species for taking grafts and a dormant time of year is the time to do it. A Google search brought up

    www.ehow.com/how_5635085_graft-oak-trees.html

    Any other suggestions to pursue?
     
  3. Charles Bastow

    Charles Bastow Member

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    Nature normally sees to that branches develop with the strength to withstand not only their own weight but also normal weather surcharging. If during growth in a suitable environment the tree is repeatedly subjected to severe effects it often changes its shape, branching pattern even branch size to enable it to continue living. As examples I would mention root patterns of trees growing from rock crevasses or tree crown shape of Mediterranean Pine on windy coastal areas. Splitting results mostly from changed wind surcharging due to increased exposure (other neighbouring trees died or removed) or new obstacle construction (wall, building or other faster growing trees). Unless you can forecast the effect which may contribute to splitting I fail to see how grafting could strengthen a zone of weakness.
     
  4. rockjock4rdg

    rockjock4rdg Member

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    Observing several other trees on my property and in surrounding stands of White Oaks, this species tends to continue to grow so much, and is so heavy that if the tree grows in an unbalanced manner it will break apart.

    I am particularly interested in trying to 'help' this tree because it is close to my house.

    I agree with you that these trees, along with other spices are exceptionally hearty, but I am just trying to help out Mother Nature with a little human engineering solution.

    Any suggestions on grafting?
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years of Activity

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    Anything killing the terminal bud or uppermost portion of central leader will cause forking. What you are asking about is not grafting, it is cabling. Search "cabling trees" or similar combination.
     
  6. Dunc

    Dunc Active Member

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    In reference to grafting a bridge across. The scion material that grafts onto old rootstock is typicaly new growth ie. young, tender and slim. It would take several years for it to grow into any structural strengrh.
    Perhaps your best option is to re-enforce it with a binding. There are lovely pictures of Japanese hemp rope bindings. Perchance you came help its structure and as well make it a picturesque topic.
     

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