Grafting Japanese Maples

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Keeb's, Jun 21, 2005.

  1. Keeb's

    Keeb's Active Member

    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sydney Australia
    Local Time:
    9:25 AM
    I have very recently attempted my first lot of grafting and it is a case of trial and error as I am experimenting and learning the art of grafting. It appears that most people graft on 1 1/2 - 2-year-old understock that is seed grown; I on the other hand am attempting to graft to cuttings struck less than 1 year ago. The cuttings I have used don't have a great root system yet, but the roots are substantial enough to keep the plants looking healthy. I have also read that most people graft to understock that is the diameter of a pencil but the understock I have used isn't anywhere near the thickness of a pencil. As I said before it is all one big experiment! If I have success it could effectively cut down the time frame for producing successful grafted maples. I guess if I can get the grafts to take the next couple of years will prove whether the plants will survive and grow strong. For an example of the diameter of the understock I have attempted to graft to check out the letter 'O' on your keyboard! It will either work or it won't I suppose time will tell. I will post some photos when I get an opportunity to take some. It appears that 2 grafts that I did 5 weeks ago (my first ever grafting attempts I might add) appear to be melding together well. It is winter here in Sydney Australia and apparently still really too early to graft. But again I am learning and experimenting:). Has anyone had any success or experimented the way I am? If I have success I will post pictures! If I don't I will use the tried and tested methods of grafting outlined in this forum.
     
  2. SilverVista

    SilverVista Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    N.Willamette Valley, OR USA
    Local Time:
    12:25 AM
    Best of luck to you with your grafting project! Be careful -- as you become successful, you will never look at plants the same way ... always on the lookout for a scion that could be snipped...

    The caliper you have described is not really that much smaller than the pencil caliper recommendation. I've grafted all the way down to 1/8", just to prove I could do it! There may be other opinions, but for me, approaching pencil caliper is the choice because the wood is thick and strong enough to stand up to being handled, and a high rate of speed can be maintained without breaking it. I use rubber budding strips to tie the scion in, and it's very difficult to put any tension on the rubber if the rootstock isn't sturdy enough to take a little pushing and pulling. The cambium layer isn't any wider on the larger-caliper stock, just the heart wood for strength.
     
  3. Layne Uyeno

    Layne Uyeno Active Member 10 Years of Activity

    Messages:
    161
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    Local Time:
    4:25 PM
    Hi Silver,

    If I could jump in here: I'm thinking of doing a couple of graftings this summer and was thinking about wrapping the graft using grafting tape and then coating that with some grafting paint. Do you think that would work?

    Thanks,

    Layne
     
  4. Keeb's

    Keeb's Active Member

    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sydney Australia
    Local Time:
    9:25 AM
    Layne Uyeno,

    Sorry I can not give you any advice, as I am an extreme novice trying some unusual techniques in my attempts to learn the art of grafting. I don't have any grafting rubbers, grafting wax or grafting tape yet I have used cello-tape (clear sticky tape) which I have used to tape up my grafts. It appears to be working for my first two grafts. Time will tell. When I get some time and some money I will go out and purchase the proper materials. Till then I will simply improvise!


    SilverVista,

    Thanks for your tips and advice. I will post pictures of my successes and or failed attempts in the coming months.


    Kind regards
     
  5. chumasero

    chumasero Active Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    sacramento, ca
    Local Time:
    4:25 PM
    My grafting rubbers: rubbers coming with my Sunday Newspapers;
    My grafting wax: tears from my son's Christmas candle;
    My humidity poly bags: plastic bags from supermarket (my wife keeps the vegetables and I have the bags);
    My grafting tape: none - I am too lazy to go to an OfficeMax to get a roll of office tape home.
    Results: so far, they work fine for my first and second Japanese maple grafts – both have taken successfully.
     
  6. Ralph Walton

    Ralph Walton Active Member 10 Years of Activity

    Messages:
    630
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Denman Island,BC
    Local Time:
    4:25 PM
    All sorts of substitutes will work, but it's worth knowing the reasons behind the choices used by the pros. The rubber (latex) stretches to allow the stem to grow without girdling itself, and in time it will rot and fall off without any further attention from the grafter. Most office tapes are not very elastic. Candle wax is typically much more rigid than grafting sealant, and may not allow growth without cracking, which would defeat the purpose. Veggie bags are as good as anything else, but some are perforated.
    The bottom line is you want to immobilise the two parts of the graft and prevent drying while the plant(s) do the real work. Nearly 50 years ago I did one with just butchers' string, no sealant, no bag and it worked fine. My Mom was not so impressed with the "branch sport" on her JM, but I was quite proud of it.
    Ralph
     
  7. SilverVista

    SilverVista Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    N.Willamette Valley, OR USA
    Local Time:
    12:25 AM
    Layne,
    Ralph pretty much said it all! I think the most important thing in summer grafting is to have mature buds on the scions, and get a good contact of the cambium. I bought a few new grafted cultivars from several sources this year, and every single one was done by a slightly different technique with slightly different supplies. All are nice, viable grafts. The most interesting technique I've seen recently was at a large seedling nursery last week. They do a little grafting as a side specialty. The grafter was using a "t-bud" method like you would use on fruit trees -- just slit the bark, slice the scion on only one side, slide the scion under the bark and wrap it up. I noticed that their maple understock was at exactly the right stage for the bark to slip easily. Tried to do a couple at home, but don't have the patience to repeat the unfamiliar process over and over to see if it could be as fast and successful as wedge or veneer grafting.

    Susan
     
  8. judyo

    judyo Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Eugene, Oregon
    Local Time:
    4:25 PM
    I am also just stqrting to graft Japanese Maples also, and would be very interested

    in learning how your experiment goes. You can reach me by responding to my
    e-mail address: judyo92@yahoo.com

    I live in Oregon, near Eugene, in the US. Our climate is ideal for these trees,
    and they do well here. I have many of them in my yard ( 1 acre of land)

    Let me know how it goes please. I also have planned to try to do what you are
    doing, so we can compare results. I will tell you which trees I use if you want.

    Judy
     

Share This Page