Golden Honey Locust/Galitsia

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by Mike, May 5, 2006.

  1. Mike

    Mike Member

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    I live in Cloverdale. The ground is basically disturbed clay (from construction) that has begun to compact again. Site will be in full sun from about 10am. Is this tree suitable? With reference to the conditions, should I start immature (3-5cm) or mature (7cm +). I want a 'tree', my wife wants to watch it grow!
    Where is a good retailer outside Langley/Cloverdale?
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    You are asking about a Gleditsia. North American analog to parasol acacias of African savannah, likewise tall and broad. Likes deep soils, some planted here don't seem to be very happy--but like many trees available in nurseries frequently planted in a variety of situations, comparatively easy to grow.

    How large-growing of a tree do you want? Size you start with may be mostly determined by what size you are offered at nearby outlet(s), the more pressing question may be size you might end up with later--after the tree has grown for some years.
     
  3. Mike

    Mike Member

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    Re: Golden Honey Locust/"Gleditsia"

    Please pardon my spelling. I'm quite new to this as you see!
    Spread is more desirable than height, 20 - 25' would be plenty. How fast could one expect them to grow?
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Maybe a couple feet per year or more, after establishment. However, as I suspected (it is often the case) you are considering a large tree for the job of a small one (25 feet is small)--unless quick effect is the top priority, with long-term suitability being sacrificed to this objective.

    A Sunburst(R) = 'Suncole' in Walla Walla, WA measured 54' x 5'8" x 63'* in 1993; a second example, in La Crosse, WI was 48' x 5'11" x 45' in 1986. 'Suncole' was introduced in the 1950s, bigger specimens than these two may be around.

    If you are after yellow specifically, there are other possibilities, maybe goldenchain (Laburnum) or goldenrain (Koelreuteria), for starters. Examples of these two more than 25' across are also around, but I don't think they are nearly as likely to form tall, broad crowns well beyond what is desired as the honeylocust. (What a specific specimen does in a given period of time varies with site conditions).

    *Height x stem circumference x average crown spread
     

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