fast growing tree

Discussion in 'Garden Design and Plant Suggestions' started by vulcan, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. vulcan

    vulcan Member

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    I am taking care of my church garden starting next spring, I want to plant some trees in the garden and I want to plant fast growing trees any suggestions?
     
  2. Harry Homeowner

    Harry Homeowner Active Member

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    How big do you want it to get?

    Does the site have sun or shade?

    Do you want something flowering, shade tree, or evergreen?

    A little more info on your wants/needs and site conditions will really help in answering your questions. Any more info you can add will help.

    Thanks.
     
  3. vulcan

    vulcan Member

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    flowery, shades and above 15 feet the lot is sunny and need beuty.
     
  4. danc

    danc Active Member

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    Transylvania, Ro
    you may consider the Foxglove Tree (paulownia tomentosa)
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Paulownia wouldn't be a good idea, it is an invasive weed in that part of North America.

    Catalpa would be worth considering.
     
  6. growing4it

    growing4it Active Member 10 Years

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    I suggest caution when choosing your tree and foresight when planting the tree. Fast growing trees can be problematic. Fast growing trees can be structurally weak, invasive and messy. Anticipate the trees mature size and locate the tree far enough away from buildings, fences, utilities and walkways.

    Decide on the 'right' tree for the place, even if it's slower growing and incorporate showy shrubs and flowers for more immediate impact.
     
  7. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member

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    I too caution against the Paulownia . I had one that lost it's main tree due to ant damage. I cut it down and next thing I knew it was sprouting every where. What are some of the trees that grow well in your area or that of the church? that might be a good start. Are you going to frame the church or are they to be planted in front of. This might determine what you choose. For eg I have a tall cedar house that sits above a slope. So when I am at the bottom of the block and look up I often think 2 or 3 of those pencil type cypress trees would look good as a frame. I am speaking of the yellow ones not the dark green.
    I already have some feathery leafed trees as part of the picture. I need a defining shape.

    Liz
     
  8. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    You wrote "above 15" feet. Is it okay if the height is rather indefinite after that?

    Is there anything significant nearby already, that has color, like a brick wall or other established trees?
     
  9. StorageShedSmart

    StorageShedSmart Member

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    I suggest you try to get to know more information about Thuja Green GLiant, Nelly Stevens Holly or Leyland Cypress. I heard that they grow fast, takes little room and can be used as a fence for privacy. You can search for information on these trees online. I just don't know if it will suit your area.
    ___________
    Mary Henderson
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 17, 2010
  10. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Definitely stay away from Leyland Cypress. Fast-growing yes, but dull and boring to look at, and prone to disease.
     

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