Fast growing privacy hedges/bushes/trees

Discussion in 'Garden Design and Plant Suggestions' started by PassionFruit, Nov 16, 2009.

  1. PassionFruit

    PassionFruit Member

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    I have a pretty vast area of coverage....and cost is definitely to be considered.....but Im hoping to get suggestions for privacy hedges/bushes/fencing

    I want something fast growing.....

    I have an area about 400 feet long where the fencing is rotting and I am wanting a more "green" approach
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Location?
     
  3. PassionFruit

    PassionFruit Member

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    Zone 7A...Maryland, USA
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    If you want something large (20-35 metres tall at maturity), try Thuja 'Green Giant'. If that's too large, then try Thuja occidentalis, of which numerous cultivars are available ('Smaragd' a.k.a. Emerald Arborvitae is a common one). Might be a good idea to mix several different cultivars (or even better, use seedling-grown plants) so the hedge has a bit more variation in texture rather than just a bland solid uniform wall of green.
     
  5. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    i agree with mixing in a couple different things - will provide visual appeal with the various textures and heights.

    i've seen forsythia used as hedging both in pruned form as well as allowing it to grow naturally. both formations look nice. i'd think allowing it to grow naturally mixed in between one or two other things would look very nice and very natural - and wouldn't require a ton of maintenance.

    definitely do a mix of evergreen and perennial so that you'll have something nice to see over the winter months. some things that flower at different times and some things that are just leaves for interest during the growing season. you could also underplant bulbs or small flowering plants for additional color throughout the summer months.

    forsythia will easily root where ever a branch touches the ground, so, one plant can easily be worked into many, many more - fairly fast grower here in 6b, so, would be even quicker where you are.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Eastern arborvitae, while very popular as represented by the 'Smaragd' cultivar is not likely to please someone asking for fast growth. The hybrid might come closer.

    http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q...&gl=us&sig=AHIEtbTukFSD7p0lLgmOjNmQ6fP-zYaPlg

    Whatever is chosen and planted, all specimens should be inspected for container-culture-caused root deformities and have these corrected at planting time - in order to prevent toppling or other difficulties later.
     
  7. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    Could you elaborate on what is meant by "culture-caused root deformities" ?
    I am researching information on the "Smaragd" cultivar for use in zone 3a-b with a height of roughtly 12- 15 feet ( 3-4 meters)
    I don't know what to look for?

    Bob
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Container culture. Stock is often left too long in small pots at some point during the production sequence. Balled-in-burlap, field-grown stock does not necessarily escape this, often having been container-grown before lining out in a field to be grown on.
     
  9. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    Thanks Ron.
    What should I see when I look at the root structure?
    Is it knoted, tangled, shriveled, smaller???

    Bob
     
  10. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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  11. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    Thanks Ron.
    I have downloaded that.
    Linda Chalker-Scott, really seems to know her stuff.



    Bob
     

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