container gardening.

Discussion in 'Conversations' started by sandpebbles, Apr 14, 2009.

  1. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    I can barely contain myself, waiting for turkey dinner. I am going to stuff myself.


    Fried turkey - now that's different! Sounds like it might be good.


    : )
     
  2. ShearMe

    ShearMe Active Member

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    1. These plants in the wild grow in rocky hillsides in between boulders and pebbles and such. Any dirt you put them in/near, they will allow their roots to go down as deep as possible, but they don't specifically need much dirt. Any pot or cup/can you put them in will be fine.

    2. "Drought tolerant" Ha! These plants THRIVE in drought conditions. Cuttings I've left in dryer areas often grow faster than those in which I water every day.
     
  3. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    ShearMe is exactly right - succulents are very drought-tolerant, and can stand long periods with no water. They store water in their leaves.

    : )
     
  4. sandpebbles

    sandpebbles Member

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    yes hollyberry, fried turkey. LOL. originally a southern favorite that has caught on. it's done in a "turkey fryer" with traditionally peanut oil (electric is safer...outdoors). peanut oil is a highly flavored, highly caloric oil that's to be used in moderation, thanksgiving and/or christmas only. by frying the turkey (all meats are brined/marinated overnight), it seals in the flavor and the juices. and not only does it cook in less than 1/2 the time, but the flavors, the moistness, hollyberry...are beyond awesome! you'll never look at turkey the same way again. Yummm! we usually make two turkeys surrounded/dressed with cornish hens. it is quite the presentation/ centerpiece.

    hey shearme. have you had fried turkey. i believe it's also quite popular in texas as well. speaking of texas, succulents...are you talking cactus. do you have a cactus garden. i have a friend who's crazy about those plants. i don't think she ever came out of a garden center without another plant to add to her collection. wow, how did i miss that. LOL. you'll have to excuse me shearme, i maybe a wee bit pepper obssessed. i sometimes can't see pass the peppers to spite my nose....yeah, i know. LOL.
     
  5. ShearMe

    ShearMe Active Member

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    Yes, we have our own turkey fryer, but for obvious reason don't use it as much as my tongue would enjoy. ;)

    Cacti are a type of succulent. I will not be sending you cacti, because they have no spines, but like cacti, the plants I shall send thrive in arid regions. My varieties tend to be found on mountain sides where little water falls, and even less water is absorbed by the non-existent soil.

    Also, don't expect the package anytime soon, I've been meaning to mail things off for so long, I just figure I should wait till early early spring. So by the way HBL, you wont be getting anything till early early spring - lol. Band will be over shortly, and I have no other extracurricular activities, so next season will be best for me to get things to other people.

    On a side note, digging in the pot where I left some corm cuttings from your mystery banana plant, HBL, I found a shoot beginning to form and smaller capillary roots spreading out into the soil! I had little hope for the piece of root, but now I believe bananas can survive anything naturally occurring. Its such a bonus to get a piece of a plant you bought for someone else to root and grow - like getting 2 plants for the price of one!
     
  6. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    Speaking of which - just took this shot of it today. Here it is..


    : )


    Also too, here is my indoor container grown commercial Crysanthemum that is about to go into full bloom!


    I will post more shots when the buds fully open. This is a very unique mum plant, and the petals look like white strings. You'll see...


    : )

     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 19, 2009
  7. ShearMe

    ShearMe Active Member

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    I'm not happy... those "maypops" I ordered, germinated, and grew, are not maypops at all.
     

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  8. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    More container gardening...


     

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  9. sandpebbles

    sandpebbles Member

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    hello guys.

    thought i'd let you know i finally committed to a 600W hps and a 400W hid. Yes!!! since i have the garage and a room in the basement i decided to split both systems originally considering the dual. for now i have the hps sitting on the garage floor (waiting for a friend to mount) and it seems to be a blessing to my fruiting plants. some of my bhut's are finally going from the orange stage to the desirable and final brilliant red. so, very cool!!! i haven't opened my hid as i'm again conflicted. although i may have remarked on my visit to my first, actual hydro store, i can't begin to express how impressed i was with the grow room. since then i've been obsessed with thoughts of building a system which i understand is quite possible. wouldn't it be nice to have a system that doesn't require changing the water frequently. not sure i like that part. i've also found some info on aquaponics. found an occasional video showing aquaponic systems with tilapia. do any of you which is better/ easier to maintain. oh and i finally picked up a bag of that promix i was originally interested in, although it's the bx not the hx. i haven't started anything yet. still deciding which way to go. i've reaaly got grow room/hydro/aquaponics on the brain. someone talk me down. LOL

    hollyberry, thanks for the seeds. it was a nice surprise. :) how did your thanksgiving go...i thought of you eating all that lovely turkey and apple pie. :)

    shearme, no worries. send the succulents when convenient. so, is that your first picture post :) just teasing. it took me quite sometime to finally post. ask hollyberry, she'll tell you. :)
     
  10. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    Unfortunately, any chatting in this section will have to be confined to pm's because the rules of the forum have been recently presented, in the form of the "Forum Charter", and this is the fruit and vegetable section, not the conversation section. I am sorry but I will no longer be able to reply, so please send me a pm.


    : )


    Excellent about your new hp sodium and halide system, Sandpebbles - now you can do a lot of container gardening over Winter. Both systems are reliable and produce excellent results. It will be great to hear about the differences between the two great systems you now have.

    Here are some more pics of some of my recent indoor container gardening. I will show pics of my halide grown plants later - haven't turned it on yet this year.

    This is my mystery container banana plant (1st two shots). The last two shots show my brugmansia cuttings that I am rooting in a glass of water (last shot shows roots). I plan on growing them in containers over Winter...


    : )
     

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  11. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Since this thread is mostly conversational (it has strayed far from the original topic that was posted), I've moved it to Conversations.
     
  12. ShearMe

    ShearMe Active Member

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    No, not my first picture pebbles, I just tend to keep the chatting in other threads. :P

    I don't know much about aquaponics, but fresh fish would be nice. ;D
     
  13. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    Hey guys:


    Here's some more shots I took today...


    1. Seed grown "magic carpet mix" Snapdragon plants ~ will bloom in November.

    2. Musa Basjoo banana pup, that is just starting to take off. Someone from the International Banana Society mailed it to me - in Ontario! Basjoo is the most hardiest banana plant of all, and it's root system is capable of surviving Canada's harsh and bitter Winters.

    I was told to protect the corm from Winter elements for one year so it can get bigger and stronger. Then you can plant it in the ground and the roots will send up new banana pups each year!

    3. My Chrysanthemum (mum) bloom, and how it looks today.

    4. Ricinus Communis ~ Castor Bean seedling (purple variety)

    5. "Burrito" baby burro's tail ~ a different shot of growing cuttings.


    : )
     

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  14. sandpebbles

    sandpebbles Member

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    shearme, hollyberry (sprouting in water...good for you shearme...:-)
    from what i'm reading, aeroponics and hydroponics can somewhat be interchangeable/ complimentary. aquaponics introduces fish waste (ofcourse non-meat eaters) as a form of fertilizer while the plants supplies additional oxygen for the fish. a symbiotic relationship complimented with full sun exposure increasing energy efficiency as well. on a smaller scale, i believe many have used goldfish with some graduating to fishes such as tilapia providing a win/win. not good with the set up however, a large fish tank (indoor usage)/ fishery (outdoor on a larger scale) with appropiate pump replaces the heavily irrigated dual pumps. i believe they can also be cycled on a timer as well. i also saw one in the hydroponics store prior to looking into it. hence, i'm due for a return visit to further investigate. question, did you build your own system. and if so, did you use the ebb and flow i keep reading about. not sure i understand the other systems. there's a deep tissue culture as well??? and aeroponics, still much to understand about that. i also found a system of large containers attached to a general centralized feed (if you will) offering support of soiless mediums. so much to understand. sounds to be a more efficient use of energy expended with an increased/rapid turnover from propagation to harvesting. 12 - 16 hrs of light is as it is in spite of growing methods. worth looking into.

    Daniel Mosquin
    not sure of the significance of this forum being moved to conversations??? this thread was started by myself as i had so many questions as a wet behind the ear grower. what i found was some generous bloggers who was (and still) willing to take the time to lend unconditional support/guidance through my many stages of gardening. i also was particularly thrilled that they were container gardeners as well often looking at growing methods, exchanging ideas, plants, seeds etc by way of friendly and thoughtful conversation. a "gem" on the internet...now how special is that. my point is, i apologize if this thread has been offensive in anyway, as it hasn't been the focus nor intention. i must admit that i was a bit put off to log on to find your presence and comments, and was even more surprised when i logged back on late last night to look over the rules posted (was a bit busy earlier) and was unable to find them. only to find that this thread has been moved to conversations. not meant as a challenge, but what does that mean? so again, i apologize and would like to see a copy of the rules as to prevent any future offense? and while i understand that this is a public forum, i now know that, this thread is being closely monitored/followed. conversations? hence with a light heart, i look forward to further understanding where i may have gone wrong.

    thank you
    sandpebbles (relatively new gardener and member)
    never offensive and always interested in compliance.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2009
  15. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi,

    I'm not certain where you're receiving your information, but it sounds to me like you are likely receiving some that is coloured by opinion.

    This thread was moved to conversations primarily because it has strayed far from the original topic -- and that's because of the conversational element. That's fine, but in the main area of the forums, I'm interested in targeted discussions, rich in information for those seeking help (the horticultural extension part of education).

    How does this affect the participants in this thread? Not much, really -- continue on as before. The conversations area of the forum has less strictly applied guidelines than other areas of the forum for letting the discussion wander.

    For your reading pleasure (I'm sure you'll enjoy reading them, as much as I "enjoyed" writing them (not) ;-) ), here are the relevant links:

    http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=4

    Specifically,

    http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=3316
    http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=57828
    and
    http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=58341

    In summation, I doubt you've done anything wrong as an individual. Collectively, the tendency to have wandering discussions isn't wrong, but better suited for the Conversations area of the forums.

    And to make it even shorter -- continue on as before.

    Cheers,
    Daniel
     
  16. sandpebbles

    sandpebbles Member

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    Daniel Mosquin

    thank you for the links and the timely reply. yes, i'm sure i'll enjoy reading them. :-) in my search/attempt to assess what may have been the problem, i did note a deleted blog? not sure what that was about. anyway, as per this hair raising/ eyes now wide open experience, i must admit it leaves one to speculate as to why information recently viewed was no longer present a couple hours later. hence, the reason for what may seem as a "lack of information". :o


    "I'm not certain where you're receiving your information, but it sounds to me like you are likely receiving some that is coloured by opinion."



    perhaps now a "non-issue", an approach of intelligence seemed best as opposed to being rendered into a crippling state of pause, an option difficult to digest by a seeker of possibilities...the gardener.



    Thank You
    Sandpebbles (relatively new gardener and member???)
    "never offensive. always interested in compliance"
     
  17. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi,

    I don't want to derail the discussion that you were having on the thread (please, continue on) but the deleted posting in this thread was requested of by a forum member who had felt insulted by it. I agreed that it was easily understood as hurtful. So, I removed it. My job to get involved, though I'd rather be talking about plants and helping others learn. I don't think I can provide too much more information without getting into the specifics of the situation.

    Anyway, unless you have further cause for concern, there's no need to reply to me in this thread. Better that it return to the friendly conversation.

    Cheers,
    Daniel
     
  18. sandpebbles

    sandpebbles Member

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    yes friendly works. pictures...

    my bhut jolokias. my harvest of not just the world's tested and documented hottest peppers, but also known for it's fickled propagation. the source behind thoughts of a promix medium. this thread. as it turns out, a soil medium + organics is an equal compliment. my plant is at my height and due to separation anxiety...LOL, is now the source behind my interest in lighting and soon to be a possible source of aero/hydro/aquaponics. enjoy. :) and yes, they live up to their name although flavorful. delicious in individual tolerable proportions which isn't always the case with the superhots.





    my 1st. bhuts waterlogged boohoo-5.jpg
     
  19. ShearMe

    ShearMe Active Member

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    My set-up is basically a plastic tub with nutrient solution aerated by a simple air pump hooked up to air stones. I have 6 buckets filled with hydroton sitting in this bubbling solution and moisture strips running from the bottom of the basket to the top where my rock-wool is located. There is another plastic piece that fits over this tub which the baskets sort of stick though into the tub, and that just keeps the nutrient solution from evaporating too fast. The moisture strips are just to keep my seeds/seedlings/cuttings hydrated until they can dig their roots down into the solution. I bought this system on Amazon and it is known as Emily's Garden, though there is no patent on the design and I'm sure you could build it cheaper yourself. (I also have one penny inside the base of each basket simply to kill bug larvae.)

    There are so many designs I cannot begin to name them all, but I could go over specific questions you have one at a time (to the best of my own knowledge, I'm rather new to this as well). Each system is different for different plants/space requirements as well as your own personal limits (money, time, skill, etc).

    You can coat an extra closet with Mylar, throw in a hydroponic system, top it off with a good grow light, and produce yummy veggies or fruits year long, though that often yields ugly plants as well (something HBL feels strongly against :P). She uses her light to "supplement" the sunlight coming in through her windows and while she might not produce as great an amount of veggies/fruit as those other people, she just enjoys keeping her plants happy (meaning green and beautiful) and does enjoy her fresh peppers year long just the same.

    Since you're thinking of growing those peppers, you're gonna definitely want a(some) HID system(s) to grow them under, my florescents never got the job done. If I haven't told you already, you should get the book "How-To hydroponics" (http://howtohydroponics.com/) as it contains the basics of hydroponics and can give you a beter understanding of how all these systems work. I'd buy it online for the color pictures myself. There are construction plans for simple systems and the author also has a store supplying everything you'd need to build these systems if they don't have it at your local hydroponics store.

    What I'd like to have in the future is a self-watering auto-pot system and/or a fog bucket system (just because the fog looks cool).
     
  20. sandpebbles

    sandpebbles Member

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    murraya koenigii
    my favorite aromatic. another fickle one. this plant came to me by way of a purchase. elated and thrilled with it's greater than 50% growth, i've also becomed attached to the delicious aroma it provides.



    20091008_62.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2009
  21. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    Good post, Zac. Yes, you've got me figured out when it comes to my plants, but don't kid yourself, I can still produce quite a few fruits over Winter - you'll see. That's right though, it's not my main concern - more interested in health and beauty. Depends what I'm growing though too.

    Sandpebbles, would you mind saving me a few of those Bhut Jolokia seeds and we'll do another exchange in Spring? I find myself low, and could use some more - if you have some available that is.

    Great shots too, btw. That plant's leaves remind me of Wisteria leaves.


    : )
     
  22. ShearMe

    ShearMe Active Member

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    Wasn't saying you couldn't produce over winter, I just think those ugly plants "produce" more in their mylar homes; I'm absolutely positive you will have more fresh food than I.

    By the way, my two gypsy peppers on my plant have yet to begin to turn red, should I just pick 'em now, or wait and hope they can still ripen?
     
  23. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    They'll be sweeter if you wait for them to turn bright red, but you can eat them whenever you want.


    I just ate a fresh gypsy a couple days ago and it was delicious. Enjoy yours, Zac.


    : )
     
  24. sandpebbles

    sandpebbles Member

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    sounds great shearme.
    an extra closet sounds curious although ventilation could be a factor. i'm thinking a good T5 system although flourescents you say isn't actually effective in application. interesting. sounds like HBL has the wonderful option of a large sunny window. always a better option. with divided growing options all of which is light challenged, i realized that the dual light system i've been looking at would be limiting. so at the last minute, i switched to both an hps for my fruiting plants and an hid for future established starts. :)
    for now, only the hps is in use. as far as a starting point, i maybe leaning towards aquaponics depending on what i find out on my next store visit. overall cost and ease of maintenance being considered factors. do you have to change your water and if so, how often. i remember your copper conversation with hollyberry. clever solution. i also picked up "Gardening Indoors with Soil & Hydroponics by George F. Van Patten". a colorful picture book seems to be a good resource however with this being new, am looking for all sources possible. thank you for the resources with supplies. i'll definitely look into it. sounds like you're ahead of me...you can see the questions coming. :) good thing. funny, hollyberry has really been a huge inspiration as often a new path can be riddled in various shades of grey and now you, a pleasant surprise. thank you. :) HBL's rooting in water. very cool shearme...LOL. yeah, fog does look cool. i did manage to find a site that shows you how to build a fogger. try; http://sywire.com/ scroll down. good presenter.
     
  25. sandpebbles

    sandpebbles Member

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    thanks hollyberry.
    LOL... not a problem. a preview of my next package. :) shearme too if interested. a gypsy. sounds promising. i'm keeping an ear out for tomatoes... :)
     

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