Chicken waste

Discussion in 'Soils, Fertilizers and Composting' started by greenboy, Oct 8, 2009.

  1. greenboy

    greenboy Active Member

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    I was told not to use chicken waste right away on the plants, to let it rest for a couple of month before taking it to the plants, I wonder if this is true or not? Please let me know. GB
     
  2. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member

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    Yeah, raw chicken poop is pretty acrid. It will burn tender roots or stems. It's generally best to let it compost for at least a year or two. If it's mixed with a lot of bedding (for me that was wood shavings) it's diluted enough to use around mature plants, but not in holes being prepared for transplants and not around young green stems.
     
  3. greenboy

    greenboy Active Member

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    wow I want something faster, what about rabbit poop I have a friend which is a rabbit farmer he can provide tons of it if I wanted, I want some organic fertilizer for next year, I want to put that on the ground now so when Spring is back the ground is ready for my plants, usually I plant tomatoes, and herbs, sometimes eggs plants.
     
  4. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member

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    Rabbit manure is excellent, and can be used immediately, just as horse manure can.

    If the animals eat nothing but plant material, you don't have to compost it. It's more attractive to you if you do because of looks and smell, but the manure will readily degrade into compost in situ.

    Keep in mind that other animals are attracted by scat so if you have a problem with critters in your yard that may be why. So to lessen that, mix the herbivore manure in with your top soil or other mulch.

    I used soiled straw or wood chip bedding from them, and not just their scat. If the animal keeper is scrupulously clean and mucks out the animals bedding very frequently, then you might be better off composting because of the fresh wood.
     
  5. greenboy

    greenboy Active Member

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    I think I go with rabbit's manure. Thanks for your info was really an education.
     
  6. 2annbrow

    2annbrow Active Member

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    Hi, friend! If you use anything that's still in the process of decomposition (which I believe fresh manure usually is), it's also a good idea to plan to add some extra nitrogen, especially in the growing season. Decomp actually uses up nitrogen while it's happening, as I found out when I "dug in" the previous year's mulch in my beds. I got lots of green growth, but few blooms!
     
  7. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    ANY kind of manure needs to 'age' a bit before it can be used. otherwise, you'll burn your stuff!!!

    you can use manure from any animal that is not a carnivore (meat eater), so, horses, cows, goats, sheep, chickens, rabbits, etc, are all likely candidates for providing some good stuff for your garden.

    it should sit for at least 6 months (with a few turning-overs/mixing ups) before you start using it. you can let it sit by itself or you can add in things like grass cuttings, leaves, garbage scraps, coffee grounds, tea leaves, etc. just remember to turn your compost pile over on a regular basis (every couple weeks) so that things get processed properly and so that the proper heat and moisture levels are maintained.
     
  8. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member

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  9. runningtrails

    runningtrails Active Member

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    If you don't compost the horse manure so that it gets really hot for a season, it will have a LOT of grass seed that will grow in your garden. The heat from composting kills most of ,the grass and weed seeds.

    I have chickens and the manure needs to be composted before use. Its extremely high in nitrogen but its great after a few months.
     
  10. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    Try nightsoil, an ancient Far Eastern solution.
     
  11. GreenElephant

    GreenElephant Active Member

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    Whatever the manure, at this time of year, it will be well aged by spring when you are ready to plant.
     
  12. Ecosoil

    Ecosoil Member

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    Good comments on many of the manures. One thing that is overlooked is that a lot of manures are actually bedding and manures. if this combination is used in an uncomposted state there can be a whole host of problems. The carbon to nitrogen rate can be way out of whack definitely causing more harm then good. Weed seeds undigested in the animal can also be a problem. The ratio of "poop to wood" is really the crux of the problem. The better cared for the animal is the less beneficial the manure is pre compost. Horses are a prime example. Uncomposted Horse manure is not a good soil amendment.
     
  13. GreenElephant

    GreenElephant Active Member

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    good point about "the better cared for the animal" Especially regarding horse manure. I like the horse people who go through the stall with the narrow tined fork and remove just the horse apples. I once got a big load of manure and shavings and it was way too much wood. Took 3 years to break down. So now I want minimal bedding and mostly manure, which I combine in my big leaf pile for the nutrient boost.
     

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