August 2018 in the garden

Discussion in 'Talk about UBC Botanical Garden' started by wcutler, Jul 28, 2018.

  1. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    If you're complaining about the heat, you'll find it very comfortable in the Asian Garden at UBCBG. It was lovely yesterday. And enjoying plants in the shade is is the theme of Douglas Justice's upcoming August in the Garden blog. There are some nifty dry fruits to amuse you. The blog starts out with the very showy and easy-to-notice Carpinus fangiana. I am so surprised that I haven't posted dozens of photos of this smashing tree already, and I can't even find more than three photos of it on my computer. I can only conclude that I never get it in focus, and yesterday's photos pretty much supported that. Here's what I got.
    Carpinus-fangiana_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360124.JPG Carpinus-fangiana_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_151047.JPG Carpinus-fangiana_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360020.JPG Carpinus-fangiana_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360028.JPG

    I knew nothing of its less showy relative Carpinus rankanensis. It's right there on the corner where Douglas says it is, just off Lower Asian Way on Farrer Trail (walking from the entrance, it's ON the far side of Farrer, on the right side of Lower Asian Way), right out there in the open at the intersection, looking totally invisible. I had to stand there and will those seed-catkins to come into view. Maybe it will be easier when they turn yellow.
    Carpinus-rankanensis_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360043.JPG Carpinus-rankanensis_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360047.JPG Carpinus-rankanensis_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360059.JPG
     
  2. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Douglas Justice's August blog is published now at August 2018 in the Garden | UBC Botanical Garden. I had already noticed the Rehderodendron macrocarpum fruits two weeks ago, now had an excuse to take more photos of them. They've shown up in previous postings, sometimes as Rehderodendron gongshanense. Douglas says all of those are R. macrocarpum. I'm not sure if he meant the names have been merged or if the ones with the gongshanense name were re-identified. There are at least three of them up on Hemsley hill, but these were all taken of a nice one I think on Lower Asian Way and Ludlow.
    Rehderodendron-macrocarpum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360071.JPG Rehderodendron-macrocarpum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360073.JPG Rehderodendron-macrocarpum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360080.JPG Rehderodendron-macrocarpum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360087.JPG Rehderodendron-macrocarpum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360090.JPG Rehderodendron-macrocarpum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360094.JPG

    I'm not sure why they're such a favourite - are they really more exciting than a tree full of apples? Fruits are a similar size and colour. But these are in the Styracaceae family, with flowers very similar to the Styrax japonicus we see so often around town, with pea-size or only slightly larger pale blue-green fruits. So seeing those flowers turn into these colourful fruits that seem like huge tough nuts is sort of amazing. Or maybe I like them because I can remember the name. Douglas gives a common name of Rehder's sausage tree - that seems a little hyperbolic, though that's likely because the sausage tree I know is Kigelia africana, but I have a display to demonstrate what I mean for the next posting.
     
  3. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    As promised in the previous posting, here are flowers of Styrax japonicus (taken in May 2016) and the fruits.
    Styrax-japonicus_UBCBG_Cutler_20160530_P1240876.JPG Styrax-japonicus_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360128.JPG

    Compare those with the Rehderodendron macrocarpum, flowers from May 2013, and fruits on a Hemsley hill tree.
    20130509_UBCBG_RehderodendronMacrocarpum_Cutler_P1450080.jpg Rehderodendron-macrocarpum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360103.JPG

    I have an excuse to include one of my favourite trees in the same family, also with rather remarkable fruits - Melliodendron xylocarpum. Flowers from May 2013. Some of these trees have flowers that are more white, but this is my favourite.
    20130505_UBCBG_MelliodendronXylocarpum_Cutler_P1440551ps.jpg Melliodendron-xylocarpum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180727_P1360123.JPG
     
  4. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The Rehderodendron fruit are a favourite of mine, because when they are mature they are like wood and very pretty. I have engraved a few and they turn into nice little Garden gifts. But alas, the past two years I cannot get a hold of any mature fruit. The squirrels take them all.
     
  5. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    @Eric La Fountaine, do you have any photos of ones you've engraved?

    Maybe with this year's bumper crop, you would be allowed to pick a few?
     
  6. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I can pick them for engraving, it's just that the squirrels take them as they ripen. I need ripe fruit for the engraving. I don't have any left to show.
     
  7. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    So those in the photos aren't quite ripe yet?
    If you do any this year, remember to show us, please.
     
  8. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    It was still cool and beautiful in the Asian Garden on Thursday, and pretty nice in the Carolinian Garden too. I'll stay with the program for a bit, mentioning the maples from the blog. They have not coloured up yet.
    I didn't know either of these maples and I didn't get close enough to the Acer erianthum trunk to even look for a label, but it's supposed to be the only maple in the bed on the east side of Rock above Forrest, and the leaves and samaras look right. There are a LOT of samaras. If these do go red this year, it should be fun to see.
    Acer-erianthum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_152132.jpg Acer-erianthum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_152311.jpg Acer-erianthum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_152539.jpg Acer-erianthum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_152750.jpg

    I had got distracted in the Carolinian Garden and forgot I was supposed to be looking for Acer spicatum. Finally as I was leaving I found a maple, wondered if it would do, and luckily, it was just what I was looking for. I wasn't at all certain, after reading about the "upright candle-like stalks", but those are the feather-weight flowers, not the samaras. All the photos I see of the fruits are drooping.
    Acer-spicatum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_164628.jpg Acer-spicatum_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_164650.jpg
     
  9. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Back to strange fruits. I hadn't got over to the Carolinian Garden when I posted the three Styracaceae in posting #3. If I had, I'd have included this Halesia tetaptera in the same family. Pretty cool fruits. I don't have a flower photo from the same tree. They are white, and the tree I always photograph is a pink variation. But this one has the largest fruits.
    Halesia-tetaptera_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_161621.jpg

    There is a different Halesia species near the beginning of the Carolinian Garden, near the Lobelia cardinalis. I named my photos, but I'm not certain I have it right, so I will leave it unnamed for now. It looks like it's suffering from the hot dry weather. If it's the one I originally thought, it would prefer to be in a floodplain. Interesting that it has some lingering flowers, though it likely flowered in May with the other Styracaceae I photographed here.
    Halesia-dipteraMagnifloraGroup_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_165842.jpg Halesia-dipteraMagnifloraGroup_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_165832.jpg Halesia-dipteraMagnifloraGroup_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_170049.jpg Lobelia-cardinalis_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_165732.jpg

    Here is Ptelea trifoliata, with samara fruits, though single, not double samaras like the maples.
    Ptelea-trifoliata_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_163921.jpg

    I don't remember rose hips being this creepy. This is Rosa roxburghii f. normalis, not one that we've posted here. I'm not even sure what the flowers look like - photos that come up on a query look not quite believably varied, but it seems they're pink.
    Rosa-roxburghii-f-normalis_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_151431.jpg Rosa-roxburghii-f-normalis_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_151455.jpg Rosa-roxburghii-f-normalis_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_151516.jpg Rosa-roxburghii-f-normalis_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_151543.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2018 at 10:20 PM
  10. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Here are two trees with fruits that are bladder-like pods, but the trees are not related. The Koelreuteria paniculata, in the Sapindaceae family (the maple family!) is such a show-off on the entrance plaza, first when it has its yellow flowers, and then when the almost golden pods appear. The pods are looking very showy now.
    Koelreuteria-paniculata_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_144444.jpg Koelreuteria-paniculata_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_144510.jpg Koelreuteria-paniculata_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_144713.jpg

    Oh dear, I knew this was Staphylea pinnata, in the Staphyleaceae family, didn't even have to look it up or look for a label, but now when I check my list, that species name isn't there. I don't know what to say about that. These leaves have five or seven leaflets, so that should rule out the other names on my list in the north garden.
    Staphylea-pinnata_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_161053.jpg Staphylea-pinnata_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_161225.jpg Staphylea-pinnata_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_161353.jpg
     
  11. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    A few more fruits that will never go in a fruit basket. The first is from Magnolia macrophylla; it will eventually turn red.
    Magnolia-macrophylla_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_162649.jpg

    Aesculus pavia fruits will not turn anything. Is this even a colour?
    Aesculus-pavia_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_162440.jpg

    Trochodendron araliodes with green fruits that stay green, if I remember that correctly.
    Trochodendron-aralioides_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_151100.jpg

    Some Philadelphus fruits turn purple. This species isn't identified; I'm not sure what it will do. I haven't noticed this one before - it has huge (for Philadelphus) leaves.
    Philadelphus-sp_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_150014.jpg Philadelphus-sp_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_150024.jpg

    Carpinus caroliniana, in the Carolinian Garden, has leafy-looking bracts hiding tiny green fruits.
    Carpinus-caroliniana_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_164259.jpg Carpinus-caroliniana_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_164301.jpg Carpinus-caroliniana_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_164514.jpg

    And here is one with no fruits, but I'd really like to see the fruits, and they would go in a fruit basket. It's Asimina triloba, paw paw. I haven't photographed it before, have not seen the flowers (which from photos are pretty interesting in themselves). There are a few of these trees; I don't know if they are different enough varieties to allow cross-pollination (or if they have even flowered). Asimina triloba - Wikipedia has an extensive write-up on this. Forum member Durgan has posted some photos of paw paws from his garden in Ontario at 24 October 2017 Pawpaw Asimina triloba.
    Asimina-triloba_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_162219.jpg Asimina-triloba_UBCBG_Cutler_20180809_162250.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2018 at 11:24 PM

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