Apple tree pest damage

Discussion in 'Fruit and Nut Trees' started by Anne NV, Oct 12, 2017.

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  1. Anne NV

    Anne NV New Member

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    I live in North Vancouver. Our Apple tree, about 6 years old, has developed a problem. I believe it is round headed Apple tree borer. Attached are some pictures. I have never spotted an adult but I can see the larvae. Wood bugs have also settled into the wounds now. This all appeared since spring of this year.

    We are thinking it is beyond repair and that we’ll need to take it out and put in a new one, however I’m wondering if the soil will be infected and it will be a problem for a new tree too.

    Advice?

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  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    *bump* on behalf of original poster.
     
    Anne NV likes this.
  3. vitog

    vitog Well-Known Member

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    I can't see the photos, but information on the Web confirms my suspicion that the borers live in the tree for their entire life cycles. Therefore, the soil under the tree will not be infected. However, the adults had to come from somewhere nearby; and the problem could recur for a new tree.

    A BC government Web site, https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/f...ops/plant-health/pacific_flatheaded_borer.pdf, suggests some sprays that should be effective. Another Web site suggested painting the tree trunk with white latex paint to reduce borer damage. The latex paint would also protect against sunscald, which may be useful. Note that most of the information on the Web refers to the Flatheaded Borer or Pacific Flatheaded Borer, but the information should be applicable to the Roundheaded Apple Tree Borer, which seems to be much rarer on the west coast.
     

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