another late mystery at 7000 feet

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Tomina, Sep 5, 2017.

  1. Tomina

    Tomina Active Member 10 Years

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    So to the right is a late paintbrush. But what was that flower to the left?
    September 1 at 7000 feet in Mount Assiniboine Park, BC.
    I first thought from the overall flower shape and rocky location, that this flower might have been a phaceillia, but the leaves suggest something entirely different. I would love to know!
     

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  2. Tyrlych

    Tyrlych Active Member 10 Years

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    The left one looks like Saussurea nuda, Daniel posted photo on BPoD:
    Saussurea nuda
     
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  3. Tomina

    Tomina Active Member 10 Years

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    Wow! Excellent! Thanks so much. This one is very new to me and it is great to still be discovering new flowers in the alpine. Actually, while I said this was at 7000 feet,
    it was more likely at some elevation just over 8000 feet, I now realize. This fits with what is written about Saussurea nuda online. So are these common in the Ukraine?
    It was the only one I noticed on this particular hike.
     
  4. Tyrlych

    Tyrlych Active Member 10 Years

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    S.nuda is not listed for Ukraine.
    And as I remember I have never seen even those Saussurea species which I see listed, so the genus is not that common here.
     
  5. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    It seemed common enough on Mt. Gass, but I don't often get into high elevation Rockies to give you a broader perspective.
     

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