Acer palmatum 'Corallinum'

Discussion in 'Acer palmatum cultivars (photos)' started by mjh1676, Apr 18, 2005.

  1. mjh1676

    mjh1676 Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    561
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    This is a very outstanding cultivar. This tree is representative of a group of trees with primaily 5 lobed palmate leaves emerging with a pink to salmon/red color in the spring. The leaves mature later in the spring with a reddish hue before turning mostly green in the summer. The petioles and young bark have a silight red or coral tone, but not enough to give it credibility as a colored-bark cultivar.

    In spring the young chutes, petioles, and leaves are all a bright pink-red color making an outstanding impression. It can show some very light veriegation in summer, but I have not seen much of it.

    Overall, it is a very slow grower in containers and not much faster in the ground. The tree pictured is about 5 years old. It remains very twiggy, and only slowly do the branches gain any sort of measureable calliper.

    These photos were taken this April 2005, the brighter leaves are backlit by sun low in the west. The coloration seen is in moderate shade and is just after the brightest spring color display.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. mjh1676

    mjh1676 Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    561
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    Tree update with photo from 5/5/05. Moving on to summer color as the pink turns to red over green.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Carl Bergstrom

    Carl Bergstrom Member

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Corallinum in July.

    (I've only had this plant for a couple of months, and so far this looks an awful lot like katsura to me. We'll see what happens next Spring.)

    Best regards,
    Carl
     

    Attached Files:

  4. mjh1676

    mjh1676 Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    561
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    Hi Carl,

    I think you have a pretty shot at having your tree be the intended plant. It is not Katsura so rest easy there. The bark color of this tree is really very helpful in determining the variety. I see a some pink color on the bark and that is a good sign. Only the oldest wood starts to lose the color and the new twigs will be pink or coral also. This is a very twiggy plant and a slow grower.

    I have wondered about mine when I look at the leaves, but the spring color and the bark are hard for me to ignore. Your leaf color is different than I have seen on mine, but our trees are in very different cultures.

    All my best,
    Michael
     
  5. Carl Bergstrom

    Carl Bergstrom Member

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Well then, maybe my katsura is a corallinum. ;)

    Seriously, though, I suspect you're right. The katsura has red stems on the newest growth, but the older wood loses the red color well before that on the corallinum does so.

    Cheers,
    Carl
     
  6. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,424
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    It is better to show at least one photo of the entire
    plant to let us have a better idea as to what the plant
    is. In Michael's case the photo that shows the whole
    plant showing the color of the Spring growth and the
    trunk and bark coloring is pretty accurate for what
    'Corallinum' looks like in Oregon from several
    sources.

    The other Maple looks more like a 'Beni kawa' by
    the leaf size, shape and color or a seedling thereof
    as the true form 'Beni kawa' only gets to about 4' tall
    in about 12-15 years grown in the ground here but
    there are some seedlings that came about in the late
    80's in Oregon that have been sold at various times
    in the nursery trade as both 'Beni kawa' and 'Sango
    kaku'.

    There is some thought that one of those seedlings
    that we saw a lot that came in from Oregon in the
    very late 80's, early 90's may have been what the
    Europeans are calling their 'Eddisbury' instead.
    When we saw the size of the plants that came in
    to various retail nurseries here from Oregon, we
    immediately dismissed them as being either a
    'Sango kaku' or a 'Beni kawa'.

    Jim
     
  7. mjh1676

    mjh1676 Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    561
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    Just an update taken today. Here is the basic summer color of this plant with some filtered afternoon sun. While I have not seen a large overall increase in size from terminal chutes, I am seeing some new buds opening on the inside of the plant. This one is not much for summer growth. Even with some hot afternoon sun, it seems to hold up well.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. mjh1676

    mjh1676 Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    561
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    Just in case I had not posted enought pics of this tree---I could not leave out fall.
    11/05/2005

    MJH
     

    Attached Files:

  9. mjh1676

    mjh1676 Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    561
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    The tree is a little larger this year and the spring color is good as ever. I have heard and read of people saying that this tree can be tender and hard to grow at times, but I have never had that problem. After four years it rarely has a burned leaf and never fails to be astounding--in a pot no less.

    It has to be one of my favorites, even for a hotter dry climate. It was one of the last to leaf out this year, so frost was not an issue and never has been.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. rkburgess

    rkburgess Active Member

    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    st. louis missouri
    [​IMG]

    I hope this works this way. This in one of my smaller 'Corallinum'

    Kent
     
  11. amazingmaples

    amazingmaples Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,065
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    snohomish
    I have lost a few of these in the past but this one I have had for a few years. It did suffer some lose of leaves this spring but many other similar trees had the same issue. I really like the trees color. I added a photo of it in august
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Aug 9, 2011
  12. Kanuni

    Kanuni Active Member

    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Turkey
    I have recently bought this imported tree and the label of it wrote Acer Palmatum Corallinum. But I suppose they should be smaller? The height of this tree is about 10 - 11 feet. Is there anyway to know whether this tree is a true corallinum by looking at the bark color and general shape of the tree before the buds break?
     

    Attached Files:

  13. maf

    maf Well-Known Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    1,355
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Northamptonshire, England
    That one is not the true 'Corallinum', which is a smaller shrubby plant and would not have the bright bark colour or upright habit.

    Often the coral bark maples, such as 'Sango kaku'/'Senkaki', have been sold under the name 'Corallinum' and that seems to have happened here.

    The original 'Corallinum' is believed to have been introduced by Hillier's nursery of Winchester, England. Description from "Hilliers' Manual of Trees and Shrubs", circa 1970:
     
  14. Kanuni

    Kanuni Active Member

    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Turkey
    Is there a way to know whether this tree is a senkaki or a sango kaku once it leafs out? Or should I think that it is only a seedling of one of them?
     
  15. maf

    maf Well-Known Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    1,355
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Northamptonshire, England
    It would be difficult to know for sure, as many of the coral-barks look very similar. Often the seedling selections can look very close to the parent tree. Even the "experts" often do not know for sure, I believe there are several different clones that have been sold under the name 'Sango kaku' in various parts of the world.

    Some authorities claim that 'Sango kaku' and 'Senkaki' are the same cultivar, while others maintain they were originally different trees.

    Some interesting reading on the subject in these threads:
    Sangu kaku...red bark appears only in winter?
    Winter Bark
     
  16. Kanuni

    Kanuni Active Member

    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Turkey
    Thanks maf.
     
  17. kaydye

    kaydye Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Live in Mapleton, Illinois, zone 5
    I agree this is a cultivar I have been really impressed with. Mine is container grown and I never really thought of it as having "coral bark" but the foliage goes through some really interesting changes over a season. It has been a really vigorous and strong grower, doesn't seem to like or need excessive water, which I had read and have to agree. It has to be potbound in a terra cotta pot, but continues to grow. I have quite a lot of variegation/mottling of leaves (green and red/pink) in the summer on newer growth which is really attractive. It's one of my favorites (you can probably tell). So I am hoping it really is Corrallinum. Mine is also twiggy and is also 5 years old. The thing that impresses me is that it has taken no shaping to grow into an attractive tree.
    Kay
     
  18. Mayer74

    Mayer74 Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Roseville, California
    I bought this little tree and was told it was an ACER palmatum Corallinum. It doesn't look like yours...any ideas what this could be? Your pics are fantastic. Sorry, don't know why it's sideways.
     

    Attached Files:

  19. maf

    maf Well-Known Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    1,355
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Northamptonshire, England
    Welcome. Sometimes young/new Acer palmatum grafts do not look as they should due to various reasons including cultural practices at the nursery and storage and shipping issues. You should have a better idea of its true form and color when it leafs out next spring. Until that time any speculation as to the ID will be a shot in the dark.

    If it still looks wrong for 'Corallinum' next spring, your best chance of getting an ID will be to start a new identification thread in the main maples area of the forum: Maples
     
  20. Mayer74

    Mayer74 Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Roseville, California
    Thanks. I'll wait.
     
  21. maplesmagpie

    maplesmagpie Active Member

    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Zone 5b, along Lake Michigan in WI
    This was a variety I really wanted to try, but in our Polar Vortex winter of last year, the rabbits ate everything above snow level. It came back very strong this spring, though-- very bushy and compact. It also kept its spring color through almost the entire summer, only starting to turn green in late summer while at the same time pushing out more bright pink new growth. It got several hours of sun, probably 8-2 every day. This is a photo from mid October.

    It was one of my favorites, even if it was stumpy. The color was a delight every time I walked by it. This year it has a wire cage.
     

    Attached Files:

  22. maplesmagpie

    maplesmagpie Active Member

    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Zone 5b, along Lake Michigan in WI
    Well, the Corallinum from last year had more die-back this winter, so now I've cut it back severely and will see how it does in a pot.

    In the meantime, I ordered another from Topiary Gardens. I was expecting a small, bushy plant, but instead got a tall plant with a thick trunk (for a 1-gallon specimen) and a few shorter branches. It's healthy as can be, but the form is so different than my previous Corallinum (from Acer1987 on ebay) that I'm left scratching my head. We'll see how it grows and fills in.

    New Corallinum leaves opening up....
     

    Attached Files:

  23. maplesmagpie

    maplesmagpie Active Member

    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Zone 5b, along Lake Michigan in WI
    Just wanted to update... I don't think my previous post shows a Corallinum. It looks much more like Seigen or Seigai/Bonfire.

    The funny thing is, my other Corallinum doesn't necessarily look like Vertrees' Corallinum, either. To be sure I did a photo search for close-ups of the specific Corallinum Vetrees describes at Hillier Gardens and Arboretum in Hampshire, England. In the 4th Edition he has only a picture of the tree, which from a distance looks like a large, beautifully pink shrub-like tree with small leaves.

    Photographers who have visited that tree took closer photos, and this is what I found. I think it's very helpful for seeing what Vertrees was describing when he wrote about Corallinum:

    Source for photos: http://jcra.ncsu.edu/resources/phot...p?query=All_Plant_Names_Serials&search=100151
     

    Attached Files:

  24. maplesmagpie

    maplesmagpie Active Member

    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Zone 5b, along Lake Michigan in WI

    Attached Files:

  25. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    I wonder if Corallinum and Shin Deshojo could be confused as the same plant (or either of the two) ? I have a Shindeshojo that I originally started as a bonsai project from a tiny graft but later decided to let it grow out in the field where it's now growing free (actually I just forgot initially) . I may at one point get a air layer to try that bonsai project.

    Anyway, back to my question. I really wonder if Corallinum and Shindeshojo has some specific characteristics that I should look for to know the difference . My Shindeshojo look awfully like the Corallinum pic I'm seeing in this thread or other places (or maybe missing the obvious sign to know the distinction). I don't have Corallinum to compare side by side.

    Any obvious sign I should look for? I like to order a Corallinum at some point. Here's my Shindeshojo (what if it's a Corallinum? :)) I'll attach couple of photos of my Shindeshojo (hopefully this wont be consider as 'Thread hijacking :-( )
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page